E-Scrap News Magazine

Updated: 11 hours 59 min ago

Washington sees slight bump in CRT collections

Thu, 06/11/2015 - 11:31
Washington sees slight bump in CRT collections

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

June 11, 2015

E-scrap firms processed slightly more CRT glass from Washington state in 2014 than they did the year before, according to a report.

Processors handled 10,666 tons of CRT glass in 2014, up 1.3 percent from the CRT weight processed in 2013, according to the annual report by the Washington Materials Management and Financing Authority (WMMFA), the electronics manufacturer-funded group coordinating collections and recycling under Washington's E-Cycle program.

The year-over-year CRT tonnages in Washington and other states are being closely watched within the industry as observers try to determine when collection programs will reach the tipping point at which CRT take-back numbers start to fall. Such decreases would be an indication those programs may be close to finishing handling the backlog of CRT material that has accumulated in homes and businesses over the past several decades.

Overall, about 22,181 tons of e-scrap were recycled through E-Cycle in 2014, down almost 2 percent from the year before. Numbers previously released by the Washington Department of Ecology, which oversees the e-scrap program, showed the collected weight of TVs continues to increase, while monitors and computers continue to decrease.

In 2014, seven e-scrap recycling firms managed material from Washington, and the report indicates much of the leaded glass they received moved through Mexico en route to India, where it's recycled into new CRTs.

More than 98 percent of the material received by the processors was recycled in 2014, and only about 1.5 percent -- mostly wood from TV cabinets -- went to landfill, according to the report. The weight of wood sent to landfill increased nearly 20 percent over the year before.

At the same time, the weight of wood recycled increased about 4 percent.

In 2014, roughly 550 tons of electronics were resold and reused, the vast majority of which were resold by the collectors and were never sent to e-scrap processors, according to WMMFA. That estimate is a rough estimate based on both objective and subjective information received from collectors. Nonprofit collectors, in particular, tend to focus on resale and see recycling as a secondary option, according to the report.

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Wide world of e-scrap

Thu, 06/11/2015 - 11:30
Wide world of e-scrap

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

June 11, 2015

An estimated 76 percent of e-scrap workers in India suffer respiratory ailments, and leaders in the Philippines may soon consider an extended producer responsibility law for electronics.

A mobile service and Internet provider in Bahrain has announced the launch of an e-scrap collection campaign in the small Middle Eastern country. Zain Bahrain, working with government officials, will place drop-off bins at various locations, including schools and malls. Zain Bahrain has contracted with Enviroserve to handle reuse and recycling.

With growing volumes of e-scrap and a largely informal recycling sector, e-scrap workers in India are suffering physically, a report says. The report by the Associated Chambers of Commerce and Industry in India states 76 percent of e-scrap workers suffer from respiratory ailments. With rising incomes, India is seeing more e-scrap, but the vast majority is processed in urban slums by untrained workers without proper protective equipment, the report states.

Philippines government officials and environmental activists plan to submit a proposal for extended producer responsibility to the Congress of the Philippines for consideration, according to the Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism. The groups, led by the EcoWaste Coalition, support strong regulations to promote the environmentally sound management of scrap electronics and appliances.

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Patent watch

Thu, 06/11/2015 - 11:28
Patent watch

June 11, 2015

Patent No. 8,979,974 was awarded to Tokyo's National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology for a method of recovering rare earth elements from scrap materials.

Kaohsiung, Taiwan's Hong Jing Environment Company also developed a rare earth element recovery system and was given Patent No. 8,986,425.

A device for optically sorting scrap plastics is the subject of Patent No. 9,000,318, given to International Business Machines Corp. from Armonk, N.Y.

Panasonic Intellectual Property Management Co., Ltd., from Osaka, Japan, was awarded Patent No. 9,024,224, for a method of identifying and recycling scrap plastics containing brominated flame retardants.

Patent No. 9,039,806, given to International PGM Technologies from Delta, British Columbia, describes a method of recovering precious metals from scrap materials.

A method of recovering rare earth elements from scrap materials is the subject of Patent Application No. 20150047469, given to Tokyo's JX Nippon Mining & Metals Corp.

Danbury, Conn.-based Entegris, Inc. was awarded Patent Application No. 20150050199 for a method of leaching lead from solid materials, such as lead-containing CRT glass.

Erdmann GmbH & Co., headquartered in Menden, Germany, has developed a shredding device and has been given Patent Application No. 20150060583.

Patent Application No. 20150066677, which describes a pre-acquisition auction for recovered electronic devices, was given to San Diego's ecoATM, Inc.

A group of Newark, Delaware-based researchers led by Miha Zakotnik was awarded Patent Application Nos. 20150068030 and 20150069677 for two methods of recycling magnets recovered from scrap hard drives.

For more information on these or any patents, please consult the U.S. Patent Office database at http://patft.uspto.gov/.

Copies of patents can be ordered by number for $3 each from the Commissioner of Patents and Trademarks, P.O. Box 1450, Alexandria, VA, 22313-1450.

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Certification scorecard

Thu, 06/11/2015 - 11:27
Certification scorecard

June 11, 2015

With the roster of companies attaining third-party certifications or audits continuing to grow, E-Scrap News has compiled a roundup of the firms announcing certification this past week.

B & K Technology Solutions d/b/a Advanced Technology Recycling of Tonawanda, N.Y. is now certified to ISO 14001, OHSAS 18001 and R2:2013.

Information Systems Resources of Dearborn, Mich. is now certified to the following standards: e-Stewards, ISO 14001, OHSAS 18001 and R2:2013.

In Confidence P/L of North Melbourne, Australia; Jayhawk File Express LLC of Topeka, Kan.; Lemay Mobile Shredding of Vancouver, Wash; Lincoln Archives of Buffalo, N.Y.; Loss Protection & Investigations, Inc. of Fresno, Calif.; MARS LLC of Olympia, Wash.; Piranha Paper Shredding LLC of New Berlin, Wis.; and Tiger Shredding and Recycling LLC of Baton Rouge, La. have either achieved or renewed their NAID Certifications for Physical Destruction of Hard Drives.

 

E-Scrap News has added OHSAS 18001 and NAID AAA into its certification directory, as well as moved the directory online. If your firm recently completed these certifications, a CHWMEG audit or an ISO 9001, ISO 14001, R2, RIOS or e-Stewards certification, e-mail dleif@resource-recycling.com to be included in this section and in E-Scrap News' directory. The full directory is available here.

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NewsBits from E-Scrap News

Thu, 06/11/2015 - 11:26
NewsBits

June 11, 2015

Researchers have developed a technique that allows e-scrap to dissolve. The material is in effect eaten away by acid escaping from wax. By heating the wax, the microscopic drops of acid are released and dissolve components of the material. The research was conducted by experts at the University of Illinois.

IT asset disposition, once considered a cost to large businesses, is now being considered a possible profit center for those corporations, writes an expert on supply chain business site EBNonline.com. In addition to being the environmentally right thing to do, having certified e-scrap firms handle businesses' old electronics also ensures data security and, through refurbishment and resale, a return on investment.

North Carolina Public Radio takes a look at one e-scrap firm that turns a profit, albeit a small one, from refurbishing and reselling e-scrap cast off by local organizations. Durham-based Triangle Ecycling relies on interns from local high schools to help with much of the refurbishing.

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UK study: Rare earths abound in landfills

Wed, 06/03/2015 - 12:47
UK study: Rare earths abound in landfills

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

June 4, 2015

Research out of the U.K. lays out the opportunities and limitations of extracting rare earth elements from landfills.

The research, appearing in the journal Waste Management, analyzes initial excavations of four closed landfills in England. The landfills contained more than 10 million tons of mixed residential, commercial and industrial waste, and researchers determined they could also be hotspots for a variety of metals, including rare earth elements.

Rare earths are essential in the manufacturing of electronics and, as the study points out, in increasingly short supply. The current recovery rate for the elements in the U.K. is estimated at less than 1 percent – landfill mining, if proven viable, could help increase that number and generate value for e-scrap processors and original equipment manufacturers alike.

The researchers, from Cranfield University, targeted the landfills because many devices were disposed of in the trash before e-scrap regulations went into effect in in the U.K. 2002.

Digging 100 feet into the dense layering of each of the four landfills, researchers found steady supplies of rare earths and other critical metals. All told, 27 metals, including 16 rare earth elements, were found. Researchers valued the potential haul at $400 million.

Researchers found the most valuable extracted rare earth to be neodymium, and they stated the value of that element in the four landfills was in the vicinity of $9 million. Yttrium, europium and dysprosium were also valuable elements found.

But the Cranfield team also concluded the process of excavation was both costly and complicated and likely only viable with the simultaneous extraction of additional materials.

Study authors also noted mining metals in landfills containing only industrial waste could be a more cost-efficient process.

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2015 Recycling Innovators Forum: Entry deadline extended

Wed, 06/03/2015 - 12:46
2015 Recycling Innovators Forum: Entry deadline extended

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

June 4, 2015

The deadline has been extended until June 15 for submitting a proposal to the Recycling Innovators Forum.

The 2015 Recycling Innovators Forum is seeking entries from people and organizations with actionable ideas to advance recycling.

Up to 10 finalists will receive travel and lodging scholarships to attend the Resource Recycling Conference, to be held Sept. 28-30 in Indianapolis, Indiana. The finalists will present their ideas to a panel of judges and an audience of industry decision-makers and investors at the Recycling Innovators Forum, held on Sept. 28 in conjunction with the conference. Judges will select a winner to receive a $20,000 prize to help move their innovation forward.

In 2014, a finalist was Fundente Production Partnership, which aimed the tackle the challenging CRT glass market by using the material as a fluxing agent at copper smelters.

The third-annual Recycling Innovators Forum is made possible thanks to major sponsorships from the American Chemistry Council's Plastics Division, Waste Management and Resource Recycling, Inc., with additional support from the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries and the Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers.

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Portrayal of Agbogbloshie disputed again

Wed, 06/03/2015 - 12:44
Portrayal of Agbogbloshie disputed again

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

June 4, 2015

Ghana's infamous Agbogbloshie area has become "an international byword for 'African e-waste dumping,'" journalist Adam Minter writes in a recent article.

But, Minter states, the district in the middle of Ghana's capital is home to a Pepsi bottling plant, small manufacturers and markets for a variety of goods, in addition to the recycling area.

"Having visited informal e-scrap processing sites in China and India, I know what to expect," Minter writes in his article in Scrap magazine, a publication put out by the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries. "The first thing I notice in Agbogbloshie's recycling zone, however, is what's missing. I don't see many electronic products or parts, certainly not enough to qualify it as one of the world's top dump sites."

That story is one of two articles in the past week that dispute mainstream media depictions of the Ghana district. The other comes from Josh Lepawsky, associate professor of geography at Canada's Memorial University of Newfoundland, who recently wrote a story in the academic-oriented media outlet The Conversation asserting the Agbogbloshie story is more complex than is typically portrayed.

Lepawsky also argues a solution needs to be found "upstream" in the way electronics are made and consumed.

The writings from Minter and Lepawsky echo other voices that have attempted to reframe the Agbogbloshie conversation.

In recent years, a wide range of publications such as The Atlantic and Wired have published stories that portray Agbogbloshie as a dumping ground for the world's discarded and exported scrap electronics.

In his article last week, Lepawsky writes infrastructure is needed to appropriately manage e-scrap discarded domestically in Ghana but that the larger media conversation has focused primarily on the movement of material from wealthier nations.

"Better than bans on exporting discarded electronics or improving collect-destroy-recycle systems would be to enhance systems of repair and reuse," he writes.

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Community collection

Wed, 06/03/2015 - 12:43
Community collection

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

June 4, 2015

We take a trip across the country and detail some recent municipal e-scrap recycling efforts.

Kansas City residents will have the opportunity to drop off hard-to-recycle items during an upcoming collection event. In addition to e-scrap, residents can drop off clothing, bicycles, batteries, mattresses and other items. Surplus Exchange will be collecting e-scrap at no charge, except for monitors, which cost $10 to drop off.

Thunder Bay, Ontario-area residents could play a hand of blackjack and drop off their e-scrap in the same trip at a collection event hosted by OLG Casino Thunder Bay. The casino donated the proceeds from the collected electronics to a local nonprofit organization.

Columbia, Mo. residents were invited to drop off all e-scrap for free at a recent collection event jointly hosted by the city and Boone County.

Salt Lake City residents can drop off electronics and a variety of other materials at one of numerous upcoming collection events. Old electronics, including computers, cell phones, TVs, stereo equipment, printers and fax machines, will be accepted free of charge.

Residents of Indiana's Montgomery, Parke and Putnam counties can drop off e-scrap at the Tox-Away Day event, which, as the name suggests, accepts a number of toxic substances. In addition to pesticides, paint and lawn chemicals, the event will accept e-scrap and appliances for no charge, except for TVs, which cost $10 to drop off.

Residents of Columbus, Ohio were recently able to drop off e-scrap at the annual WCBE yard sale. The radio station collected phones, computers, cameras, chargers, DVD players, fax machines, monitors and more in conjunction with Goodwill Columbus.

Arlington, Mass. residents can donate e-scrap and appliances at a collection event to benefit nonprofit organization Fidelity House. All types will be accepted, although there will be a charge to drop off TVs, monitors and appliances.

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E-Scrap 2015: Plug into practical solutions

Wed, 06/03/2015 - 12:41
E-Scrap 2015: Plug into practical solutions

June 4, 2015

Start planning now to be sure your company is represented at the North American e-scrap industry's biggest business-building and networking conference.

E-Scrap 2015 will offer well-curated sessions covering the topics that matter to electronics processors and advocates. Experts will analyze EH&S issues, innovative technologies, refurb hot topics, export realities and much more.

E-Scrap 2015 is taking place Sept. 1-3, 2015 (the week before Labor Day) at Omni ChampionsGate in Orlando, Florida. Last year's conference brought together more than 1,300 attendees from 35 countries and similar numbers are expected for the upcoming iteration. Check in at e-scrapconference.com for all the latest information on exhibiting, sponsoring and attending.

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Ocean freight system remains over capacity

Wed, 06/03/2015 - 12:38
Ocean freight system remains over capacity

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

June 4, 2015

While the value of most recovered materials remain at weak levels, recycling processors report one bright light: The cost to move containers from the West Coast to Asian markets remains at fairly low levels.

Cheaper-than-usual westbound ocean freight rates are the result of two key factors.

First, shipping demand remains at depressed levels due to a sluggish global economy. At the same time, container-shipping operators have all rushed to bring new, huge ships into operation and as a result, vessels are operating at far below maximum capacity. In such a market, freight shippers, such as recycling firms, have been able to push rates down.

A variety of shipping companies, such as A.P. Moller-Maersk and China Shipping Container Lines, have very recently brought into operation large ships that can each carry 8,500 40-foot containers.

Some analysts say these market conditions will continue, especially as the major shipping lines bring even more big vessels into the fold.

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Wide world of e-scrap

Wed, 06/03/2015 - 12:36
Wide world of e-scrap

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

June 4, 2015

Germany has been referred to the European Court of Justice because of its failure to adopt an e-scrap directive, and a local government in the United Arab Emirates collected more e-scrap than ever before.

The European Commission has referred Germany to the European Court of Justice over the country's failure to enact e-scrap legislation. Germany was supposed to integrate into its national laws the Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment Directive by February 2014. The commission is asking the court to impose a $234,279 daily penalty until the law is put in place.

Residents of India will learn about proper e-scrap management as part of a national initiative called Digital India, which was planned by Prime Minister Narendra Modi's government. According to The Economic Times, the campaign will educate people on digital literacy and e-scrap management. It is expected to launch in July.

The Fujairah Municipality in the United Arab Emirates collected 16.5 tons of e-scrap and electrical appliances this May, more than it had collected during any other year. The 20-day program yielded phones, computers, TVs and more for recycling.

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Certification scorecard

Wed, 06/03/2015 - 12:32
Certification scorecard

June 4, 2015

With the roster of companies attaining third-party certifications or audits continuing to grow, E-Scrap News has compiled a roundup of the firms announcing certification this past week.

All Points Mobile Shredding of Stuart, Fla.; Lifespan International, Inc. of Commerce, Calif.; Ray’s Trash Service, Inc. of Indianapolis; R.K. Black, Inc. of Oklahoma City; SecurShred of South Burlington, Vt.; The Shred Authority of Alsip, Ill; and The Shredder of Des Moines, Iowa have either achieved or renewed their NAID Certifications for Physical Destruction of Hard Drives.

E-Scrap News has added OHSAS 18001 and NAID AAA into its certification directory, as well as moved the directory online. If your firm recently completed these certifications, a CHWMEG audit or an ISO 9001, ISO 14001, R2, RIOS or e-Stewards certification, e-mail dleif@resource-recycling.com to be included in this section and in E-Scrap News' directory. The full directory is available here.

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NewsBits from E-Scrap News

Wed, 06/03/2015 - 12:31
NewsBits

June 4, 2015

A woman in California's Silicon Valley donated a very rare 1976 Apple I computer to e-scrap recycling firm Clean Bay Area, which later discovered the treasure amid boxes of donated materials and sold it to a collector for $200,000. Consistent with its policy, Clean Bay Area plans to split the proceeds with the woman – if the company is able to track her down.

Old smartphones would be attached to shopping cart handles and provide shoppers with information and allow them to scan and purchase items. That idea for reusing smartphones won the inaugural Smartphone Encore Challenge by Sprint. The team that developed the TouchCart concept hails from the University of California, Berkeley and received a $5,000 prize to help further the idea.

E-scrap nonprofit group Free Geek Toronto has received a $20,000 grant to support its E-Waste to E-Learning program. Through the program, donated computers are turned into learning and work opportunities for underserved and marginalized people, allowing them to gain important work-readiness skills.

Best Buy has the largest retail e-scrap collection program in the world, and it didn't get there overnight, says the company's senior director of environmental service. In an article on GreenBiz, Scott Weislow talks about Best Buy's experience developing its collection program and offers advice for those looking to launch their own collection programs.

Scientists at the University of Wisconsin, Madison have developed a type of semiconductor made from wood scraps. It's flexible and almost entirely biodegradable, they claim.

Companies now spend 8 percent to 10 percent of their revenue maintaining reverse-supply-chain functions for electronics. The Wall Street Journal takes a look at what's involved in managing the e-scrap, from destroying data securely to navigating changing regulations in different countries.

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PC shipments down in 2015

Thu, 05/28/2015 - 09:17
PC shipments down in 2015

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

May 28, 2015

With smartphones and tablets continuing to lure global users away from personal computer purchases, the International Data Corporation says PC shipments in 2015 will be down for the fourth consecutive year.

According to the latest market forecast from IDC, shipments of PCs in 2015 will be down 6.2 percent compared to 2014 totals. IDC had earlier projected 2015 shipments would be nearly even with last year's numbers.

While the availability of Windows 10 is expected to give a boost to shipments, estimated at 289 million units for the year, the rise of smartphone and tablet usage all but guarantees the fourth consecutive year of down numbers.

Smartphone shipments this year, which could approach 1.5 billion units worldwide, will grow by 11.3 percent, IDC says. That's compared with 26.7 percent growth in 2014, but still indicates "robust growth" is ongoing in various markets worldwide.

According to IDC estimates, tablet shipments in 2015, while also posing a threat to the PC market, won't quite match 2014 levels.

For the year, IDC says global tablet shipments will be down 3.8 percent and total 221.8 million units. Analysts had predicted a 2.1 percent growth in tablet shipments for 2015.

Using IDC's current shipment estimates for all three device categories, approximately 2 billion PCs, smartphones and tablets are expected to ship worldwide in 2015.

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<i>E-Scrap 2015</i>: On the ground in Ghana

Thu, 05/28/2015 - 09:16
E-Scrap 2015: On the ground in Ghana

May 28, 2015

The infamous e-scrap hotspot Agbogbloshie has been the focal point of numerous news stories and photo galleries that portray the Ghana district as a hellish dumping ground for the world's old electronics.

However, in recent months some observers have begun arguing the Ghana story has been blown out of proportion. A compelling panel discussion at E-Scrap 2015 will delve into the issue and offer a platform for individuals who have visited the site and know the facts. The panel will include both outspoken critics of material exports as well as voices that say moving electronics to African markets does far more good than bad.

Be sure to be at E-Scrap 2015 to gain a better understanding of this ever-nuanced exports issue and to fit your business into the industry's increasingly global footprint.

E-Scrap 2015 is taking place Sept. 1-3, 2015 (that's the week before Labor Day) at Omni ChampionsGate in Orlando, Florida. Check in at e-scrapconference.com for all the latest information on exhibiting, sponsoring and attending.

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ISRI testifies in favor of bulk unlocking of cellphones, tablets

Thu, 05/28/2015 - 09:16
ISRI testifies in favor of bulk unlocking of cellphones, tablets

By Jared Paben, E-Scrap News

May 28, 2015

Bulk unlocking of cellphone and tablets for resale does not violate copyright law and should continue to be allowed, the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries told the U.S. Copyright Office.

ISRI's May 26 testimony came as federal officials consider whether to renew a three-year exemption allowing for the unlocking of mobile devices. Some mobile devices have software restricting them to one company's network; "unlocking" them circumvents the restriction so they can be used on any carrier's wireless network.

"It matters to ISRI because our electronics recyclers are in the business of reusing and re-selling cell phones and tablets into the marketplace," Eric Harris, ISRI's associate counsel and director of governmental and international affairs, told E-Scrap News. "Simply put, a locked phone has less value in the market than an unlocked phone."

Under the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, the Librarian of Congress (the U.S. Copyright Office is part of the Library of Congress) determines whether unlocking of specific devices for specific purposes is permissible. In making the determination, the Librarian must decide whether somebody will be "adversely affected by the prohibition." Those seeking exemptions must prove that they will be harmed without one. Approved exemptions last for three years.

In 2012, the longstanding Librarian, James Billington, opted to outlaw unlockings, prompting a public and industry outcry. Congress stepped in and, in summer 2014, passed a law restoring a broader exemption Billington had approved in 2010. But it wasn't a permanent fix, Harris said.

Now, the ball is back in the Librarian's court to decide whether to extend the exemption.

Harris believes the wording of the bill passed by Congress allows for bulk unlocking, but it doesn't include explicit approval using the words "bulk unlocking." In his testimony, he said any unlocking exemption must include "explicit language that permits recyclers to bulk unlock for the benefit of consumers and competition," according to an ISRI press release.

"The language is still kind of dancing around it a little bit," Harris said in an interview. "We just want to give that certainty to the marketplace."

Public comments show the only opposition came from TracFone Wireless, a prepaid wireless service provider which seeks to ensure any exemption leaves it illegal for phone traffickers to buy new devices, immediately bulk unlock them and re-sell them.

ISRI believes its proposed exemption was carefully worded to avoid exempting traffickers from liability. TracFone disagrees.

          It's unclear when the Librarian of Congress will make a final decision.

 

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Buy-back brand reports spike in tablet trade-ins

Thu, 05/28/2015 - 09:15

 

Buy-back brand reports spike in tablet trade-ins

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

May 28, 2015

More than twice as many used tablets were traded in at ecoATM sites during the first quarter of this year than during the same period a year ago, according to the company.

The operator of a nationwide network of 2,100 used-electronics recycling kiosks, ecoATM also reported southern states, including Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama, saw the highest tablet collection rates.

At the same time, sales of new tablets are falling.

According to a survey commissioned by ecoATM, 27 percent of tablet owners indicated they use their tablet less than they thought they would when they first bought it. Roughly the same percentage said they use the device less than three hours per week. Eight percent said they no longer use their device.

Of those who no longer use their tablet, a majority said they prefer using their laptop instead and a quarter said their smartphone does everything they need in the mobile-device space.

The survey was conducted by Edelman Berland May 5-11 and polled 1,175 tablet owners in the U.S. The margin of error is plus or minus 2.9 percent.

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Patent watch

Thu, 05/28/2015 - 09:14
Patent watch

May 28, 2015

Patent No. 8,955,207 was awarded to Osaka, Japan's Panasonic Corporation for a method of disassembling flat panel displays.

A rotatable hammermill is the subject of Patent No. 8,960,581, given to Genesis III, Inc., based in Prophetstown, Ill.

Hsinchu, Taiwan's Industrial Technology Research Institute was awarded Patent No. 8,968,687 for a way of recovering rare earth elements from scrap electronics via proteins.

Another method of recovering rare earth elements was the subject of Patent No. 8,974,572, given to Saga, Japan's Haruo Uehara.

Pusan National University, in Pusan, South Korea, developed a method of reclaiming rare earth elements via an absorptive ball and was awarded Patent No. 8,975,207.

Patent No. 8,974,581, describing a method of recycling fluorescent lamps, was given to VaporLok Technology, based in Mankato, Minn.

Lastly, Akkuser Ltd., from Nivala, Finland, was given Patent No. 8,979,006, which describes a method of recycling batteries.

For more information on these or any patents, please consult the U.S. Patent Office database online.

Copies of patents can be ordered by number for $3 each from the Commissioner of Patents and Trademarks, P.O. Box 1450, Alexandria, VA, 22313-1450.

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Wide world of e-scrap

Thu, 05/28/2015 - 09:14
Wide world of e-scrap

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

May 28, 2015

Hungary is preparing to budget enough money to recycle 6,000 tons of CRTs this year, a 50 percent increase from last year.

Theoretically, it's not too late to recover the valuable metals in electronics dumped in landfills. A study from the U.K.'s Cranfield University detailed the potential value in extracting rare earth elements and other materials by mining old landfills. Researchers took samples from up to 100 feet down from four now-closed landfills and found neodymium and palladium, in addition to copper and aluminum. Concentrations were too low to make commercial operations viable, but it could make sense if other materials are also recovered, researchers noted.

Government officials in Hungary are preparing to set aside enough funds to recycle 6,000 tons of CRT devices this year. The funding, which has not been disclosed, represents a 50 percent increase from last year's total, the Budapest Business Journal reports.

More than 22 tons of electronics and electrical appliances were collected in the West African country of Benin during a collection and awareness drive. The drive, by MTN and Ericsson, was aimed at increasing awareness about the environmental impacts of improper disposal of e-scrap.

The city of Kochi, India has signed a deal to usher in e-scrap collections. Material including used electronics, CFL lamps, batteries and CDs will be collected at the offices of health inspectors, as well as at a mobile take-back unit. The materials will go to Earth Sense Recycle, an e-scrap company in Hyderabad.

In the Fujairah, United Arab Emirates, a 20-day e-scrap collection drive resulted in 16.5 tons of electronics collected and recycled. Officials with the Fujairah Municipality say it is the fourth consecutive year an e-scrap campaign has been held.

Ireland is one step closer to cementing its e-scrap reuse guidelines. Under a newly created program called the WEEE Register Society, refurbishment companies can register to become certified reuse vendors in the country. The registry is an attempt to provide added clarity on government-approved reuse companies.

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