E-Scrap News Magazine

Updated: 1 day 12 hours ago

What's shaping the certification landscape

Tue, 07/01/2014 - 16:46
What's shaping the certification landscape

By Jerry Powell, E-Scrap News

July 2, 2014

E-Scrap News maintains the largest database on North American electronics recycling operations. We recently used this resource to analyze the number and types of U.S. facilities that are certified under either the R2 or e-Stewards environmental health and safety standards, and we reached some notable research conclusions.

Widening in scope. A growing number of firms that hold these certifications are companies that focus primarily on logistics or collection, not electronics demanufacturing. These entities fall into categories such as nonprofit organizations; refiners; smelters; office headquarters; equipment liquidators who ship obsolete electronics to others; online phone resellers who do no processing; IT management services that send scrap items to others; toner cartridge reclaimers; battery firms; and trucking companies.

In number, certification does not dominate. When narrowing the review to only those firms that actually process material, we concluded slightly more than 1,500 e-scrap processing facilities are operating in the U.S., and about 37 percent of these sites are certified (24 percent are solely R2 certified, 4 percent are solely e-Stewards compliant and 9 percent hold both certificates).

However, in volume, certification prevails. Our database contains extensive data on many operations, such as annual sales, processing volumes, employment levels and plant size. Using this data subset, we found that the e-scrap processing market is becoming two-tiered when considering certification. Many small processors remain reluctant to spend money on certification. On the other hand, nearly every major processing plant in the U.S. is certified, and a large majority of the volume handled in this country is now moving through certified facilities.

Certification can be highly concentrated geographically. It appears competitive pressures have resulted in numerous processors in specific states becoming certified. For example, certification predominates among processors in both North Carolina and Texas.

Dual certification is a trend. When looking at which plants were certified in 2013 and this year, a large number of sites picked up their second certificate. Industry leaders point out that the cost of attaining the second certification is far cheaper than securing the first certification. Our analysis also shows that many of America’s largest facilities are dual certified.

To return to the E-Scrap News newsletter, click here

 

Colorado faces tide of old and costly CRTs

Tue, 07/01/2014 - 16:32
Colorado faces tide of old and costly CRTs

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

July 2, 2014

With an e-scrap landfill ban in place, Colorado is having trouble redirecting old computers and televisions downstream.

Part of the challenge lies in the state's unique law. Instead of passing extended producer responsibility legislation, Colorado moved to simply ban the practice of bringing old and unwanted electronics to the dump. That has left consumers, not device makers or local communities, responsible for finding recycling outlets.

And when it comes to old cathode ray tube (CRT) televisions and computers, consumers are also being asked to shell out as much as a dollar per diagonal inch just to convince recycling firms to take on the material.

"We joke around here that they're the hot potato," Rob Ashcraft of Precision Metals Recovery told the Glenwood Springs Post Independent last week. "At the end of its life, they have to be recycled."

Colorado does not have any CRT final processing operations to rely on in-state, meaning recycling firms send material out of state for final processing. Many thrift stores have started to turn back consumers hoping to drop off CRT computers and televisions and some recycling firms have decided to cut their losses and do the same, according to the Post Independent article.

If televisions and computers are found to be illegally dumped, residents face a maximum potential fine of $1,000 and up to a year in jail.

While no immediate solution appears to be on the horizon, a provision in the disposal ban permits communities "in limited situations" to opt out of the ban, the state website reads.

To return to the E-Scrap News newsletter, click here

 

EPA toughens up CRT export reporting

Tue, 07/01/2014 - 16:23
EPA toughens up CRT export reporting

By Bobby Elliott, E-Scrap News

July 2, 2014

The U.S. EPA has finalized a rule that will require exporters of CRT devices to file more frequent, detailed and accurate shipment information with the federal agency.

"The Agency has realized the necessity of obtaining additional information on the export of these materials," the ruling reads in part. The rule change updates the oft-referenced CRT rule of 2006.

Defining "exporter"

Perhaps the largest change lies in the definition of a CRT exporter. The new rule defines exporter as both the entity that directly sends material overseas and "any intermediary in the United States arranging for such export." Both exporters and intermediaries "may be held jointly responsible" for any violations with regard to the export of CRTs — previously, only exporters could be held accountable for any potential missteps.

In response to concerns that the definition of an intermediary may include collectors of CRTs who have no involvement in export activity, the agency states: "EPA disagrees with the commenters that argued the definition of 'CRT exporter' was too broad and may encompass entities that do not have knowledge of the export."

Exports for recycling

Exporters of CRTs sent for recycling will now be required to submit a new annual report "no later than March 1 of each year … summarizing the quantities, frequency of shipment and ultimate destination(s) … of all used CRTs exported for recycling during the previous calendar year," the rule reads. By collecting annual data, the EPA hopes to be able to better track shipments of material overseas and ensure recycling — not dumping — is taking place as advertised.

In the past, exporters were only required to submit limited annual data and one-time notices with the EPA at least two months before an anticipated shipment. 

Exports for reuse

Alongside annual reports, exporters of CRTs for reuse will be required to submit more detailed, one-time notices outlining "exports for reuse expected over a 12-month period" as well as information regarding where they will be headed and how they will be reused. "Some CRTs that are exported for reuse are actually disassembled and recycled under unsafe conditions," the rule notes.

Previously, exporters of CRTs for reuse needed only to submit basic contact information with the EPA before sending material out of the country

The rule was signed by EPA head Gina McCarthy on June 18. It will go into effect in early 2015.

To return to the E-Scrap News newsletter, click here

 

Certification scorecard

Tue, 07/01/2014 - 16:15
Certification scorecard

July 2, 2014

With the roster of companies attaining third-party certifications or audits continuing to grow, E-Scrap News has compiled a roundup of the firms announcing certification this past week.

Fortune Plastic & Metal is now certified to the R2:2013 and RIOS standards at its sites in Avenel, New Jersey; Bakersfield, California; Brooklyn, New York; Central Falls, Rhode Island; Dallas; Denver; El Paso, Texas; Fredericksburg, Virginia; Jersey City, New Jersey; Lincoln, Rhode Island; McDonough, Georgia; Naperville, Illinois; Pharr, Texas; Portland, Oregon; Rahway, New Jersey; and Tampa, Florida;

Advanced Technology & Recycling has become certified to the ISO 14001, OHSAS 18001 and R2:2013 standards at its facility in Hoover, Alabama. In addition, the company's facility in Pontiac, Illinois achieved OHSAS 18001 certification.

ATI SecureDocs of Austin, Texas; Green Country Shredding and Recycling, Inc. of Tulsa, Oklahoma; Super Shred of Greenville, North Carolina; and The Shredder of Des Moines, Iowa have either achieved or renewed their NAID Certifications for Physical Destruction of Hard Drives.

Also Maxxum, Inc. of Rush City, Minnesota has renewed its NAID Certification for Computer Hard Drive Sanitization and Physical Destruction of Hard Drives.

E-Scrap News has added OHSAS 18001 and NAID AAA into its certification directory, as well as moved the directory online. If your firm recently completed these certifications, a CHWMEG audit or an ISO 9001, ISO 14001, R2, RIOS or e-Stewards certification, e-mail dleif@resource-recycling.com to be included in this section and in E-Scrap News' directory. The full directory is available here.

To return to the E-Scrap News newsletter, click here

 

NewsBits

Tue, 07/01/2014 - 16:09
NewsBits

July 2, 2014

A staff briefing on the link between counterfeit electronics parts in U.S. defense systems and e-scrap will be held on July 8 in Washington, D.C. The briefing, organized by Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse, a Democrat from Rhode Island, will include three panelists and touch on how and why old parts from used and end-of-life electronics may end up making their way into defense systems — the group Coalition for American Electronics Recycling has pointed to the issue as more reason to pass an export ban on e-scrap.

Arguing that change is "desperately needed," an editorial on the Toronto Star urges new Environment and Climate Change Minister Glen Murray to right the e-scrap recycling ship in Ontario. After losing Sims Recycling Solutions' Mississauga plant due "to an unfortunate case of government blocking economic growth," the editorial suggests wholesale adjustments are needed at the legislative level to allow companies like Sims to "compete in an open marketplace" instead of through the e-scrap stewardship group, Waste Diversion Ontario.

A new series of photographs over at National Geographic documents the underground e-scrap marketplace in India. Despite tremendous economic growth in recent years, the country is inundated with piles upon piles of end-of-life electronics — as the photos show — and impoverished Indians turn to the potentially toxic devices to recover and resell any valuable remains.

To return to the E-Scrap News newsletter, click here

 

Exporter of UK e-scrap to serve time

Thu, 06/26/2014 - 20:36
Exporter of UK e-scrap to serve time

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

June 27, 2014

A U.K. businessman has been sent to jail for exporting e-scrap to Africa.

Joe Benson, an Essex-based e-scrap processor and CEO of BJ Electronics, was sentenced to serve 16 months in jail following an investigation by the Environment Agency (EA).

Between September 2012 and April 2013, EA intercepted four containers headed for several African countries including Ghana and the Ivory Coast. The containers were said to contain about 50 tons of scrap electronics and electrical equipment collected through municipal collection programs in and around London. According to EA, they had not been properly tested beforehand to verify whether they needed to be responsibly recycled or could be reused.

According to electronics reuse advocate and founder of of the World Reuse, Repair and Recycling Association (WR3A), Robin Ingenthron, much of the electronics in the intercepted containers were in working condition, and he claims to have over 200 documents individually itemizing reuse-ready items in various containers sent by Benson over the years.

Ingenthron, who has been referring to the scrap processor as "Hurricane" Joe Benson (in reference to the boxer "Hurricane" Ruben Carter, who was wrongly imprisoned and the inspiration of a famed Bob Dylan protest song), says that an earlier study also pointed out that Benson, in fact, has been shipping highly reusable material.

"An UNEP study found a 91 percent reuse rate from the televisions from Joe Benson's containers — a number actually higher than brand new products sold in Ghana and Nigeria," Ingenthron said.

"'Hurricane' Joe Benson's loads are completely documented and researched, and we believe he is becoming a cause célèbre of reuse," Ingenthron added.

Before pleading guilty to the new charges, Benson had been vigorously fighting a separate 2011 conviction alleging he had illegally shipped e-scrap to Nigeria.

To return to the E-Scrap News newsletter, click here

 

Young Ontarians see barriers to e-scrap recycling

Thu, 06/26/2014 - 20:32
Young Ontarians see barriers to e-scrap recycling

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

June 27, 2014

Despite data pointing to an increased commitment to recycling among young adults living in Ontario, a new survey shows electronics recycling remains on the back burner for most.

Of the 500 Ontarians between the ages of 18 and 29 who participated in the Ipsos Reid survey, just 22 percent said they've recycled an electronic device in the past year. A far higher percentage – 62 percent – considered themselves "environmentally conscious" while two-thirds of participants identified improper disposal of electronics as an environmental concern.

A staggering 74 percent of respondents cited numerous barriers to recycling electronics, including inconvenient drop-off locations, a lack of disposal information and "the worry about their stored personal information getting into the wrong hands," a press release announcing survey results states.

Ontarians pay an Environmental Handling Fee when purchasing a new electronics devices – that fee, similar to California's Electronic Waste Recycling Fee, goes toward funding the proper recycling of end-of-life e-scrap by the device makers and importers.

To return to the E-Scrap News newsletter, click here

 

Sims closes operations in Canada, UK

Thu, 06/26/2014 - 20:30
Sims closes operations in Canada, UK

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

June 27, 2014

In a move bound to have ripple effects throughout the industry, a pillar of the e-scrap world has announced major closings in Canada and the U.K.

Sims Recycling Solutions (SRS), the e-scrap division of publicly traded Sims Metal Management, announced the sudden closures on Tuesday. All three of SRS' Canadian sites will be closing – accounting for nearly 300,000 square feet of processing space – and "a substantial portion of SRS in the U.K." will also close, the initial announcement reads.

Steve Skurnac, SRS' president, explained the decisions in greater detail in an email to E-Scrap News:

In Canada, the recycling of e-scrap is effectively controlled by the manufacturers through a virtual monopoly organization, EPRA, that sets volumes and pricing. Without the ability to effectively manage inflows and recycling rates, it is difficult for any recycler to support investment in technology, capacity and quality standards.

In the U.K., there is a substantially more recycling capacity than material currently available in the market and as such competition for material is very aggressive. Consequently Sims is reviewing our processing capabilities in both our U.K. scrap metal division and our EU electronics recycling division to determine if there is a more competitive way for us to process available material.

EPRA's director of harmonization, Jay Illingworth, declined to comment "until more information is provided by Sims on their restructuring internationally."

It is not yet known which of Sims' U.K. facilities will close. The company website lists locations in Cheshire, Middlesex, Dumfriessire, Stockton-on-Tees, Glasgow, Gwent and Warwickshire.

The company will release further findings from an ongoing review of SRS' global "operations and strategy" on July 23. The "restructuring" is expected to cost Sims between $80 million and $85 million in charges and impair goodwill by $20 million to $30 million, the release states.

Sims recently closed facilities in Texas and New Jersey as part of larger consolidation efforts in the U.S. It was not widely known that the company was considering further closings.

To return to the E-Scrap News newsletter, click here

 

Patent watch

Thu, 06/26/2014 - 20:26
Patent watch

June 27, 2014

Patent No. 8,739,708 was awarded to New York, New York's Yuriy Rabiner for a method and equipment for processing of electronic scrap materials.

Institute of National Colleges of Technology of Hachioji, Japan and Polytech Kagawa, Co., Ltd. of Marugame, Japan were jointly awarded Patent No. 8,747,519 for a method of recovering copper from coated wire.

A method for producing polycarbonate resin partially produced from recycled materials, including shredded compact discs, is the subject of Patent No. 8,748,510, given to Tokyo, Japan's Sony Corporation.

Nippon Crucible Co., Ltd., from Tokyo, Japan, produced a novel apparatus for recovering precious metals, the subject of Patent Application No. 20140151943.

Patent Appication No. 20140156883, regarding a method and apparatus for removing data from scrap electronic devices, was given to San Diego, California's EcoATM, Inc.

A method of recovering precious metals is the subject of Patent Application No. 20140165786, awarded to Petr Dedek, from Paha, Czechoslovakia.

For more information on these or any patents, please consult the U.S. Patent Office database online.

Copies of patents can be ordered by number for $3 each from the Commissioner of Patents and Trademarks, P.O. Box 1450, Alexandria, VA, 22313-1450.

To return to the E-Scrap News newsletter, click here

Certification scorecard

Thu, 06/26/2014 - 20:22
Certification scorecard

June 27, 2014

With the roster of companies attaining third-party certifications or audits continuing to grow, E-Scrap News has compiled a roundup of the firms announcing certification this past week.

Cohen Electronics of Middletown, Ohio is now certified to the following standards: RIOS, ISO 14001, OHSAS 18001, e-Stewards and R2:2013.

3N Document Destruction, Inc. of Clifton Park, New York; Bayaud Enterprises of Denver; Business Records Management, Inc. of Clearwater, Florida; Highland Shredding, Inc. of Woburn, Massachusetts; Intercon Solutions, Inc. of Chicago Heights, Illinois; RecordsPro / Shredmonkey of Indianapolis; Shred Ace of Durham, North Carolina; and The Shredder of Des Moines, Iowa have either achieved or renewed their NAID Certifications for Physical Destruction of Hard Drives.

E-Scrap News has added OHSAS 18001 and NAID AAA into its certification directory, as well as moved the directory online. If your firm recently completed these certifications, a CHWMEG audit or an ISO 9001, ISO 14001, R2, RIOS or e-Stewards certification, e-mail dleif@resource-recycling.com to be included in this section and in E-Scrap News' directory. The full directory is available at www.tinyurl.com/Certified-E-scrap.

To return to the E-Scrap News newsletter, click here

NewsBits

Thu, 06/26/2014 - 20:16
NewsBits

June 27, 2014

Congress' latest effort to establish federal legislation when it comes to unlocking mobile devices has earned the praise of the outspoken e-scrap recycling advocate Kyle Wiens. The founder of iFixit notes on the group's blog a recently proposed Senate bill on the unlocking issue is one that includes legal protections for cell phone recycling firms and other "bulk unlockers." A previous attempt at legislation in the House included wording that could have hampered e-scrap companies' efforts to refurbish old phones and re-sell them.

The United Nations-backed StEP Initiative has issued a guidance document to help governments, businesses and other groups establish standards for effectively and responsibly dealing with end-of-life electronics. The main components detailed in the report — the complications of data security and transboundary shipment of material, for instance — will likely be well-known to most e-scrap players, but the document serves as helpful primer for individuals trying to wrap their heads around the full scope of electronic material management.

The federal EPA has moved to finalize CRT export regulations. Signed last week by EPA head Gina McCarthy, the newly cemented rule will require U.S. exporters of CRTs for reuse or recycling to provide greater documentation to the agency — significantly, it will also require suppliers of exporters to report data and movement flows to EPA, which will use the data to ensure CRTs are getting recycled abroad.

To return to the E-Scrap News newsletter, click here

SERI announces R2 Leader Program

Tue, 06/17/2014 - 14:00
SERI announces R2 Leader Program

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

June 18, 2014

The new home for the R2 standard has made its first substantial move by creating a designation that honors responsibility-minded businesses and groups outside the e-scrap industry.

SERI (Sustainable Electronics Recycling International), which recently replaced R2 Solutions, announced the R2 Leaders last week as a means to involve entities supporting the R2 certification and "the responsible reuse and recycling of used electronics," a press release from the group reads.

"Since the creation of the R2 Standard for responsible electronics recycling in 2008, we have consistently heard from companies and organizations that wanted to support reuse and recycling efforts," said John Lingelbach, executive director of SERI. "Working in tandem with these leaders who share our vision will significantly accelerate progress in developing responsible e-waste reuse and recycling policies, programs and facilities."

The R2 certification is one of the two major environmental certifications employed by e-scrap facilities in North America. The other primary certification is e-Stewards.

The 10 companies and nonprofit organizations that have emerged as inaugural members of R2 Leaders are: DIRECTV, Goodwill Industries International, Greeneye Partners, Keep America Beautiful, Microsoft, Panasonic, Sony America, SourceAmerica, Wistron Corporation and Xerox. None of the R2 Leaders are e-Stewards Enterprises, the similarly business, organization and community-focused wing of the e-Stewards certification.

As R2 Leaders, each member will be expected to send end-of-life electronics to an R2-certified recycling firm wherever possible. They will also each support a specific project in support of SERI's broader "responsible recycling" cause, with potential projects including pilot recycling programs in developing countries.

"For many years, we've vetted recycling vendors before we agree to ship them our electronics," Diane P. O'Connor, Xerox's vice president of global environment, health, safety and sustainability, said in comments to the Connecticut Post in the wake of the R2 announcement, "and we encourage other companies to do the same."

To return to the E-Scrap News newsletter, click here

 

E-Scrap 2014: The latest on the CRT crisis

Tue, 06/17/2014 - 13:59
E-Scrap 2014: The latest on the CRT crisis

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

June 18, 2014

Discussion of downstream options for CRT glass — and the associated pricing — has consumed the electronics recycling industry for several years, and at E-Scrap 2014, the CRT debate will get its due treatment.

To help clarify the current situation and anticipate where it's headed, a conference session will offer a full rundown of the North American processors still standing and those hoping to get in on the notoriously narrow-margin market. Distinguishing "established" and "emerging" operations, as well as pointing out who's amassing stock versus who's actually processing it, the presentation will provide attendees with a complete picture of the CRT landscape.

Whether you're running a collection program inundated with old TVs or trying to find downstream processors you can trust, this valuable session will serve as both education and encouragement.

E-Scrap 2014 will be held Oct. 21-23 at Orlando's Rosen Shingle Creek. The 2013 edition saw more than 1,300 attendees and 125 exhibiting companies, so plan now to secure your spot at this fall's conference. Get all the latest information at e-scrapconference.com.


To return to the E-Scrap News newsletter, click here

Survey on facility safety shows room for improvement

Tue, 06/17/2014 - 13:57
Survey on facility safety shows room for improvement

By Bobby Elliott, E-Scrap News

June 18, 2014

A survey has found what appear to be glaring holes in the e-scrap industry's occupational health safeguards.

The survey, which was launched as part of an interagency partnership between the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) and the federal EPA, included 47 U.S. e-scrap facilities run by 19 different companies. Despite the small sample size — the survey had hoped to include more than 100 facilities and reached out to 276 — results indicate that worker safety protocols are inconsistent at best, despite "the potential for a wide variety of occupational exposures," the survey states.

For instance, 42 of the 47 facilities reported accepting CRTs, devices known for their high lead content, and 26 reported actively processing the items. Just 22 of the surveyed facilities, however, test workers for blood lead levels "pre-placement." A total of nine facilities indicated testing on an annual or bi-annual basis, raising further questions about whether or not facilities are taking the right steps in ensuring occupational safety.

"We are concerned that in facilities that break CRTs, employees do not have access to medical surveillance and proper workplace controls," NIOSH's Diana Ceballos told E-Scrap News.

Of the surveyed facilities, 80 percent were R2-certified while another 68 percent were e-Stewards-certified. The survey encourages site visits to further evaluate and understand occupational health protocols.

Of the 47 facilities, 13 permitted workers to eat and drink in the production areas — a potentially dangerous allowance that could lead to the ingestion of hazardous substances.

One facility even permitted employees to wash their work uniforms at home, potentially "provid[ing] a route of take-home exposure to family members," according to the report.

The study did find that larger facilities managed to provide greater health safeguards.

To return to the E-Scrap News newsletter, click here

 

Utah regulators tell processing firm to clean up its act

Tue, 06/17/2014 - 13:56
Utah regulators tell processing firm to clean up its act

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

June 18, 2014

A CRT-collecting e-scrap firm in Utah has come under extensive state-level scrutiny for being slow to address operational miscues identified by regulators.

The issues allegedly facing Stone Castle Recycling, which include improper storage of CRT glass, large outdoor and indoor stockpiles of various material and "deficiencies" in current plans of operation, were detailed in a pair of letters to the firm from Utah Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) over the past several months.

The most recent letter, dated May 22 and obtained by E-Scrap News through a public records request, implored the firm to respond to regulators and "show cause why Stone Castle should be allowed to continue operations."

This week the DEQ's Patrick Sheehan told E-Scrap News Stone Castle had until June 2 to contact the Utah Division of Solid and Hazardous Waste but failed to do so. Scott Anderson, Solid and Hazardous Waste division head, added that the agency would "continue to work with Stone Castle to resolve the oustanding issues [and] as long as they continue to make progress, they can remain open."

Stone Castle's CEO, Anthony Stoddard, told E-Scrap News that "all the issues have been addressed."

The emergence of those issues can be traced back to a March 2 fire at the company's Parowan location, which prompted the DEQ to launch an investigation of all three of the firm's sites in the state.

That fire, which occurred outdoors and burned CRTs and other materials, also led watchdog group Basel Action Network to issue a report that was highly critical of the firm. BAN's executive director, Jim Puckett, wrote the state of Stone Castle's operations were "every bit as horrible as what I've seen in Ghana or China."

The DEQ's first letter to the firm, dated April 16, detailed a list of problems identified at the locations and required the Parowan facility to be cleaned up. Regulators also told company to discontinue collecting material there.

In addition, the company's Clearfield operation was reprimanded in the April 16 letter for storing CRTs outside in "Gaylord containers that are not properly labeled, constructed, filled and closed." Similarly, the Cedar City site was ordered to label material after "the facility manager was unable to identify various wastes in storage" during a state inspection. All three sites were also asked to shore up their plans of operation to fully account for and describe the full extent of operations and storage practices.

When many of those problems were found to be unresolved, the DEQ sent its May 22 letter, again informing Stoddard to address the issues.

In February, Utah official Sheehan told E-Scrap News Stone Castle was experiencing trouble moving about 2,500 tons of CRT glass downstream.

This story has been updated to include comments from Scott Anderson of the the Utah Solid and Hazardous Waste Division.  The story additionally stated Stone Castle Recycling's Clearfield facility was certified to the R2 standard, according to the certification directory.  That listing has since been removed and R2 (now SERI) staffers confirmed the facility is not certified to the standard.  

To return to the E-Scrap News newsletter, click here

 

California aims to raise rates it pays to firms handling CRTs

Tue, 06/17/2014 - 13:54
California aims to raise rates it pays to firms handling CRTs

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

June 18, 2014

In a sign of the increasingly tight CRT market, regulators in California have moved to increase the payments issued to firms that collect and/or process lower value electronics to help them fully cover recycling costs.

Jeff Hunts, branch manager of the e-waste program at California Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery (CalRecycle), issued a Request for Approval last week to boost the collection payment for materials in the covered electronic waste (CEW) category from 16 cents per pound to 18 cents per pound. The document also recommends increasing the combined recovery and recycling payment from 39 cents per pound to 44 cents per pound.

The recommendation now needs final approval from Carroll Mortensen, CalRecycle's program director, and that action could come as soon as this week. CalRecycle will then make a filing with California’s Office of Administrative Law to enact the rate changes, which would take effect on or after July 1.

The CEW category includes CRT-containing devices, LCD TVs and monitors, LCD laptops, gas plasma display TVs, and personal DVD players.

Under California's electronics recycling law, CalRecycle is chargedwing with assessing the state's CEW payment rates every two years. Since the payment system was implemented in 2005, regulators have only once made changes to the rate. That action came in 2008, when officials dropped the combined rate by 9 cents per pound. The state draws payment amounts from a fund that is fed by recycling fees paid by consumers when they purchase new devices.

To determine whether increases in CEW payment rates are warranted, CalRecycle each year requires collectors and recycling entities to submit reports that show revenues and costs associated with CEW management during the previous year, and a number of those reports are audited.

"CEW claim data suggest that approximately 98 percent of claims by weight were for CRT devices," CalRecycle reported in a background document accompanying the payment increase request.



To return to the E-Scrap News newsletter, click here

Certification scorecard

Tue, 06/17/2014 - 13:52
Certification scorecard

June 18, 2014

With the roster of companies attaining third-party certifications or audits continuing to grow, E-Scrap News has compiled a roundup of the firms announcing certification this past week.

Global Environmental Services LLC is certified to the following standards at its facilities in Austin, Texas and Georgetown, Kentucky: ISO 9001, ISO 14001, OHSAS 18001, R2:2008 and e-Stewards.

Alliance Document Shredding, Inc. of Sulphur Springs, Texas and Shred Ace of Durham, North Carolina have either achieved or renewed their NAID Certifications for Physical Destruction of Hard Drives.

E-Scrap News has added OHSAS 18001 and NAID AAA into its certification directory, as well as moved the directory online. If your firm recently completed these certifications, a CHWMEG audit or an ISO 9001, ISO 14001, R2, RIOS or e-Stewards certification, e-mail dleif@resource-recycling.com to be included in this section and in E-Scrap News' directory. The full directory is available at www.tinyurl.com/Certified-E-scrap.

To return to the E-Scrap News newsletter, click here

 

NewsBits

Tue, 06/17/2014 - 13:50
NewsBits

June 18, 2014

Ending a long back and forth, the City of Buffalo, New York and the federal EPA have reached an accord. The city will host nine community collection events for fluorescent light bulbs, e-scrap and household hazardous waste – spending a minimum of $79,000 – to make amends for past violations by the city for improperly storing and failing to clearly label warehoused materials, including e-scrap.

The Canadian wing of office supply and electronics chain Staples has announced sustainability goals of diverting 20 million ink cartridges by early 2016. Staples is also aiming to collect over 220,000 pounds of alkaline and rechargeable batteries in 2014 through its ongoing partnership with North American battery recycling coalition Call2Recycle.

New York City's e-CycleNYC initiative now has a presence in all five boroughs. Staten Island was the only borough without a participating apartment building, but that changed this week when the Snug Harbor Apartments complex joined the service, which allows residents in buildings with 10 units or more to bring their end-of-life electronics to a centrally located drop-off space. According to New York officials, more than 250 buildings now participate.

To return to the E-Scrap News newsletter, click here

 

Former CRS head in legal battle

Wed, 06/11/2014 - 12:34
Former CRS head in legal battle

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

June 12, 2014

The founder of an embroiled East Coast e-scrap company is being sued for allegedly misrepresenting the firm's value.

Jonathan Yob, who founded and served as the president of Creative Recycling Systems (CRS) for 18 years, is at the center of a lawsuit claiming Yob overstated the value of CRS when it was sold in 2012 to a group of investors. The investors, working together as a limited liability corporation named Intersection One, acquired CRS from Yob's JY Creative Holdings only to come to believe they had drastically overpaid for a company barely "treading water."

"Defendants led the Investors to believe that CRS was a profitable, large-scale, stable company with healthy cash flow," the lawsuit reads. "What Defendants failed to disclose to the Investors was that this depiction of CRS was premised upon abject, widespread and systemic fraud."

Yob did not immediately respond to a request for comment. A CRS representative said the firm does not comment on pending litigation.

The lawsuit, which is ongoing, alleges Yob valued CRS at $55 million while its true value, as of September of 2013, was "approximately $20 million." The lawsuit was filed Sept. 16, 2013 and was first reported on by the Tampa Bay Business Journal.

A February 2014 court document from Yob's legal team denies any wrongdoing.

The Tampa Bay Business Journal recently reported CRS indicated it is closing an e-scrap processing facility in Tampa. In a separate lawsuit, Regions Bank claims CRS owes $18 million in debt.

To return to the E-Scrap News newsletter, click here

 

E-Scrap 2014: Extended trade show hours

Wed, 06/11/2014 - 12:33
E-Scrap 2014: Extended trade show hours

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

June 12, 2014

To further bolster the experience of the growing number of conference attendees and vendors, the exhibit hall at E-Scrap 2014 will open a day earlier than in years past. The hall will open Tuesday, Oct. 21, and hours that initial day will be 2:00 to 5:00 p.m.

These extended hours provide additional time for attendees to view and learn about the latest products and services from the over 125 exhibiting industry companies that are expected to be on hand at E-Scrap 2014 in Orlando, Florida. Following the new extended trade show hours on Oct. 21, attendees and exhibitors can continue their conversations at the ISRI Welcome Reception, which will be held from 5:30 to 7:00 p.m.

The trade show will be open normal hours on Wednesday, Oct. 22 and Thursday, Oct. 23. E-Scrap 2014 will be held Oct. 21-23 at Orlando's Rosen Shingle Creek. The 2013 edition saw more than 1,300 attendees and 125 exhibiting companies, so plan now to secure your spot at this fall's conference. Get all the latest information at e-scrapconference.com.

To return to the E-Scrap News newsletter, click here

 

.

.