E-Scrap News Magazine

Updated: 27 min 8 sec ago

Certification scorecard

Wed, 05/13/2015 - 16:53
Certification scorecard

May 14, 2015

With the roster of companies attaining third-party certifications or audits continuing to grow, E-Scrap News has compiled a roundup of the firms announcing certification this past week.

Yesterday's Business Computers, Inc. of Hillsborough, N.J. is now certified to the ISO 14001, OHSAS 18001 and R2:2013 standards.

Access of Chico, Calif.; C2 Management of Berryville, Va.; Dakota Data Shred of Sioux Falls, S.D.; EnviroShred NW of Portland, Ore.; Green Team Shred-Safe of Pooraka, Australia; International Paper Recycling of Des Moines, Iowa; Kard Recycling Service, Inc. of New Berlin, Wis.; LionCage of Kew Gardens, N.Y.; Metro Record Storage and Shredding of Bakersfield, Calif.; On-Site Shredding of Stamford, Conn.; Paper Dragon of Grand Island, Neb.; ShredTex of Houston; and Tri State Shred of Dubuque, Iowa have either achieved or renewed their NAID Certifications for Physical Destruction of Hard Drives.

E-Scrap News has added OHSAS 18001 and NAID AAA into its certification directory, as well as moved the directory online. If your firm recently completed these certifications, a CHWMEG audit or an ISO 9001, ISO 14001, R2, RIOS or e-Stewards certification, e-mail dleif@resource-recycling.com to be included in this section and in E-Scrap News' directory. The full directory is available here.

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NewsBits

Wed, 05/13/2015 - 16:52
NewsBits

May 14, 2015

A judge has ruled that E-Waste Systems owes former employees at a now-shuttered Ohio processing facility more than $51,000 in back pay, and Cincinnati Reds fans can score tickets to a game by participating in an e-scrap collection event.

A judge in Ohio has ruled in favor of the former employees of publicly-traded E-Waste Systems, Inc. Plaintiffs who worked at the company's now-shuttered Springdale, Ohio processing facility were awarded more than $51,000 in back pay, court documents show. In addition to the Ohio closure, E-Waste Systems has closed operations in New York and California, leaving the company with no active facilities.

Brockport, N.Y.-based Sunnking, Inc. has purchased Coast 2 Coast Electronics Recyclers, a move that provides the Sunnking with a brick-and-mortar presence in Syracuse, N.Y.. Founded in 2000, Sunnking's facilities are R2 certified.

Cincinnati Reds fans can help the environment and score tickets to a game by arriving early to an e-scrap collection event. The PNC/Players for the Planet E-Waste Recycling Drives will ">"provide free Reds tickets to the first 200 cars to arrive at the collection events.

Washington state is preparing rules requiring electronics manufacturers to submit more details to the state regarding composition of e-scrap collected and whether it is reused, recycled or disposed. The state's Department of Ecology is beginning the process of amending rules to incorporate recently passed legislative changes, which also include changes to how each company's collection targets are calculated. Click here to sign up for the listserv providing details on changes.


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CEA reports all-time high recycling in 2014

Wed, 05/06/2015 - 16:05
CEA reports all-time high recycling in 2014

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

May 7, 2015

The Consumer Electronics Association has announced manufacturers recycled 660 million pounds of end-of-life electronics in 2014. The group has a goal of reaching 1 billion pounds annually by 2017.

The fourth annual report on CEA's eCycling Leadership Initiative states e-scrap recovery reached an all-time high in 2014. The 2014 total of 660 million pounds represents a 40 million pound increase over 2013's haul and is more than double the amount original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) collected during the first year of the program, in 2010.

It also highlights that virtually all material collected under the program -- 99.9 percent -- went to third party certified recycling companies.

In addition to the overall recovery increase, CEA's vice president of environmental affairs and industry sustainability, Walter Alcorn, noted the increasingly lightweight build of electronics entering the waste stream as evidence that manufacturers are "continuing to recycle an even greater percentage of covered electronics than in years past."

CEA's eCycling project, which was created to increase consumer electronics recycling opportunities in the U.S., has seen its members create more than 8,500 collection locations nationwide. The program has also been vocal in its television and radio-based outreach, broadcasting 9,192 TV ads and reaching 80 million listeners in 2014, the report notes.

While the program will continue working toward a goal of collecting 1 billion pounds of electronics by 2017, the CEA also stresses support for a "national approach" to scrap electronics recycling in the U.S.

The issue of adopting a national collection framework is a complicated one for the electronics recycling industry. Generally, original equipment manufacturers have opposed additional electronics recycling laws following the standard model of requiring OEMs to fund the programs. It is unclear what shape a national take-back program would take, although it is likely OEMs would be tasked with some level of responsibility, financial or otherwise.

CEA could not be reached for comment.

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2015 Recycling Innovators Forum launches

Wed, 05/06/2015 - 16:05
2015 Recycling Innovators Forum launches

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

May 7, 2015

Hungry entrepreneurs with innovative ideas for improving the e-scrap recycling industry will receive a helping hand this fall.

The 2015 Recycling Innovators Forum and is now accepting entries from people and organizations with actionable ideas to advance recycling. The deadline for submissions is June 1, 2015.

This fall's Forum marks the third year for the recycling innovation event.

Up to 10 finalists will receive travel and lodging scholarships to attend the Resource Recycling Conference, to be held Sept. 28-30 in Indianapolis, Indiana. The finalists will present their ideas to a panel of judges and an audience of industry decision-makers and investors at the Recycling Innovators Forum, held on Sept. 28 in conjunction with the conference. Judges will select a winner to receive a $20,000 prize to help move their innovation forward.

Resource Recycling magazine, sister publication to E-Scrap News, will also feature the winning ideas in online and print stories.

In 2014, a finalist was Fundente Production Partnership, which aimed the tackle the challenging CRT glass market by using the material as a fluxing agent at copper smelters, feeding an immediate demand for the item as a flux without undercutting higher-end lead smelters.

The third annual Recycling Innovators Forum is made possible thanks to major sponsorships from the American Chemistry Council's Plastics Division, Waste Management and Resource Recycling, Inc., with additional support from the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries and the Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers.

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Battery recycling bill on table in Texas

Wed, 05/06/2015 - 16:04
Battery recycling bill on table in Texas

By Jared Paben, E-Scrap News

May 7, 2015

The Texas Legislature's serious consideration of a law mandating take-back and recycling for all household batteries sends a signal to other states considering the same, an advocate for the bill says.

"If conservative Republicans in Texas are advocating for battery recycling, legislatures all across the country have the green light to do this," Robin Schneider, executive director of the Texas Campaign for the Environment, told E-Scrap News. "Even if the legislation doesn't pass the first time around, it provides impetus and some leverage for other legislatures to also get on board with this issue."

HB 3153 would require the battery industry create a free statewide takeback and recycling program for single-use and rechargeable batteries. Battery makers that refuse to participate would be prohibited from selling batteries in the state.

Manufacturers -- or stewardship organizations working on their behalf -- would submit plans to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, which would approve or require plan modifications. The plans would include participating manufacturers, collection locations, goals, plans for recycling and public outreach activities.

At a May 5 hearing, the House of Representatives Committee on Environmental Regulation decided to hold off approving the bill. The decision came after the author, Rep. Rodney Anderson, a Republican representing Irving/Grand Prairie, asked that it be studied in more depth because only one other state, Vermont, has established a similar program.

Some think the bill goes too far, while others think it fails to go far enough, Anderson told the committee.

"It's really trying to create a framework for an agreed-upon bill between industry, between the battery manufacturers," Anderson said.

If it isn't considered this year, the bill could be approved during the next legislative session, which would take place in 2017.

Schneider said the bill would be the first in the country to cover both single-use and rechargeable batteries.

Industry-funded nonprofit organization Call2Recycle organizes the nationwide collection and recycling of rechargeable batteries. Call2Recycle CEO and President Carl Smith testified at the hearing in favor of mandatory participation, noting that his organization pays to collect and recycle a substantial number of batteries from nonparticipating manufacturers.

In 2007, a GOP representative in the Texas House of Representatives carried a bill to establish extended-producer responsibility for computers, and another Republican authored a similar bill for televisions in 2011. Both were signed into law by then-Gov. Rick Perry.

"What we continue to show in Texas is that producer takeback recycling is not a partisan issue and there's strong support from conservative Republicans for this policy," Schneider said.

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Wide world of e-scrap

Wed, 05/06/2015 - 16:03
Wide world of e-scrap

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

May 7, 2015

Poland and Slovenia are in hot water for failing to implement European Union e-scrap and white goods recycling laws, and the head of the United Nations Environment Programme is warning of a glut of e-scrap.

The European Commission has referred Poland and Slovenia to the European Union's (EU) Court of Justice for failing to enact EU e-scrap and white goods recycling laws. Among other things, the updated EU laws include an ambitious new collection target for 2016 of 45 percent of electronic equipment sold.

The head of the United Nations Environment Programme is warning the world about dangers presented by a coming glut of e-scrap. He also pointed to the opportunities to recover vast amounts of precious materials by "urban mining." For some materials, there is a larger quantity in unused electronics above ground than there is underground.

E-scrap recycling companies in Germany are still feeling the squeeze from low values in raw materials and tougher regulations increasing their costs. A slightly higher copper value is providing a temporary reprieve, but analysts don't see reason for the trend to continue.



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Certification scorecard

Wed, 05/06/2015 - 16:03
Certification scorecard

May 7, 2015

With the roster of companies attaining third-party certifications or audits continuing to grow, E-Scrap News has compiled a roundup of the firms announcing certification this past week.

Accurate Document Destruction of Elk Grove Village, Ill.; Alliance Document Shredding of Sulphur Springs, Texas; ASDD a division of TCH is a Not for Profit of Tempe, Ariz.; ATI SecureDocs of Austin, Texas; Beacon Secure of Tucson, Ariz.; Beckley's Inc. of Rochester, Minn.; Confidential Materials Destruction Service, Ltd. of New Territories, Hong Kong; DataShield Corporation of Omaha, Neb.; Goodwill of OC/Landmark Services of Santa Ana, Calif.; Greenway Shredding & Recycling of Louisville, Ky.; Texas Security Shredding of Houston, Texas; and Valley Green Shredding, LLC of Westfield, Mass. have either achieved or renewed their NAID Certifications for Physical Destruction of Hard Drives.

Also, e-End of Frederick, Md. has renewed tits NAID Certification for Computer Hard Drive Sanitization and Physical Destruction of Hard Drives.

E-Scrap News has added OHSAS 18001 and NAID AAA into its certification directory, as well as moved the directory online. If your firm recently completed these certifications, a CHWMEG audit or an ISO 9001, ISO 14001, R2, RIOS or e-Stewards certification, e-mail dleif@resource-recycling.com to be included in this section and in E-Scrap News' directory. The full directory is available here.

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NewsBits

Wed, 05/06/2015 - 16:00
NewsBits

May 7, 2015

A California judge has ordered Dollar Tree Stores to pay $2.72 million and improve its waste disposal methods at its California stores after it was found throwing electronics, batteries and corrosive liquids in the trash. The company has already adopted new policies, procedures and training programs related to hazardous waste disposal.

Advanced Technology Recycling now holds the world record for the most e-scrap collected at multiple locations in one week, the company announced. It collected 1,180,442 pounds of electronics over a seven-day period around Earth Day at six sites, setting a Guinness World Record. The previous record, by an Australia-based company, was 1,045,491 pounds.

That shot of Office Space's Michael Bolton viciously attacking the infamously unreliable office printer isn't the only "e-scrapping" clip out there. Slate has assembled a video with the best clips of people quickly transforming their electronics into scrap.

John Shegerian and Allen Hershkowitz of Electronic Recyclers International have weighed in on the dangers exporting e-scrap to China can pose to national securit in an op-ed in the Wall Street Journal. Parts can be removed from e-scrap, dressed up to look new and sold back to the U.S. to serve crucial roles in military hardware, they write, calling on Congress to tighten export laws.  The Responsible Electronics Recycling Act, which last year failed to move out of a House subcomittee, would tighten restrictions on exports of e-scrap, but has been met with mixed support in the industry.

So far in 2015, Washington state has collected roughly the same amount of e-scrap it did last year, the state Department of Ecology reports. Last year, the state collected 44.36 million pounds of e-scrap, the first time weight collected had decreased from the year before.

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Reuse advocate calls Agbogbloshie 'a hoax'

Thu, 04/30/2015 - 09:55
Reuse advocate calls Agbogbloshie 'a hoax'

By Jared Paben, E-Scrap News

April 30, 2015

"This is the place where thousands of tons of the world's electronics go to die," The Atlantic in December wrote about Agbogbloshie, a district in the middle of Accra, Ghana. One U.S. e-scrap expert, however, says he saw no evidence of that during a recent trip to the West African country.

"It's basically a hoax," said Robin Ingenthron, founder of the Middlebury, Vermont-based World Reuse, Repair and Recycling Association (WR3A), which advocates for the fair international trade of used electronics. Ingenthron also runs Middlebury e-scrap processing business Good Point Recycling.

In an interview, Ingenthron, who visited Ghana March 28 to April 19, offered a contrasting picture of a site that's been widely described by the mainstream media as a toxic dumping ground for the world's broken e-scrap. The designation has also spurred heated debate within the industry, propelling countless U.S. companies to market their services as an antidote to foreign dumping.

According to Ingenthron, during his trip to Ghana he saw no evidence of imported e-scrap traveling from the country's port at Tema to Agbogbloshie. He estimated he spent a total of 16 hours at Agbogbloshie and another six hours interviewing people who work there.

"We saw no evidence of direct import," he said.

Ingenthron said the site mostly contained automobile scrap, in addition to appliances and some locally generated e-scrap, which was delivered on hand carts from the surrounding neighborhoods. Only 20 to 50 used electronic pieces come to the site each day, Ingenthron wrote in a press release about his visit.

Ingenthron, whose WR3A is preparing a more complete report on the visit, did note "the soil at Agbogbloshie is extremely contaminated."

"We do not condone the conditions at Agbogbloshie. We only note that ending imports will do nothing to address the problem," Ingenthron stated.

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<i>E-Scrap 2015</i>: The Academy is in session

Thu, 04/30/2015 - 09:54
E-Scrap 2015: The Academy is in session

April 30, 2015

The upcoming E-Scrap Conference will again feature the E-Scrap Academy, a lineup of expert speakers who will help industry professionals of all experience levels get fully up to speed on the practical processing matters that affect business bottom lines right now.

This year, the E-Scrap Academy will be offered as its own track throughout the conference, giving attendees a chance to take in sessions on the topics most prevalent to their own operations and abilities. Need guidance finding the right industry partners, ushering in certification, designing facility layout or negotiating deals? All that and more will be covered by industry leaders who have been profiting in e-scrap for years.

E-Scrap 2015 is taking place Sept. 1-3, 2015 (that's the week before Labor Day) at Omni ChampionsGate in Orlando, Florida. Check in at e-scrapconference.com for all the latest information on exhibiting, sponsoring and attending.

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Is the UN underestimating US e-scrap activity?

Thu, 04/30/2015 - 09:53
Is the UN underestimating US e-scrap activity?

By Bobby Elliott, E-Scrap News

April 30, 2015

A United Nations-backed study on global e-scrap generation and recovery suggests the U.S. recycling rate for end-of-life electronics and appliances sits at about 15 percent. An analysis of the method used to arrive at that figure, however, raises questions about its accuracy.

Billed as "the first comprehensive assessment" of e-scrap volumes throughout the world, the United Nations University-authored Global E-Waste Monitor 2014 estimates 7.8 million tons of end-of-life electronics and appliances entered the U.S. waste stream in 2014. Of that total, the study states, 1.1 million tons were recovered, resulting in a recovery rate just under 15 percent.

Media coverage in the study's wake has painted the U.S and China as the top "dumping" countries in the world. In announcing the release of the study, the United Nations University (UNU) largely echoed that reading of the data, noting "just two countries – the U.S. and China – discarded nearly one-third of the world's e-waste in 2014."

A closer look at the data reveals while electronics and appliances were included in the study's estimate of U.S. generation of discarded material, only electronics were counted toward the recovery total. In other words, the study used one material classification for the numerator in determining the U.S. recovery rate and a starkly different one for the denominator.

The result is a recovery rate that may significantly understate the country's e-scrap activity.

To calculate overall generation, UNU's team of researchers came up with an estimate for the U.S. through an amalgam of historic electronic and appliance sales data as well as lifespan projections by device. That method spawned the 7.8 million tons figure, which includes both end-of-life electronics and appliances in the U.S.

However, when it comes to recovery, the study's authors turned to the U.S. EPA's 2012 MSW report, the most recent set of figures available for nationwide recycling efforts. The EPA data on electronics recovery does not include appliances in its total.

According to EPA data, an additional 2.8 million tons of appliances were recovered in 2012. Had that total been included in UNU estimates for recovery, the U.S. rate would have been 49 percent.

The 2012 EPA report, meanwhile, indicates the stand-alone electronics recycling rate in 2012 was 29.2 percent.

Analysis of the UNU methodology also uncovers another questionable move on the statistical front, one that may be a simple math mistake. In noting the recovery figure determined by EPA, the UNU report states 1 million metric tons (which converts to approximately 1.1 million short tons) of electronics were recovered for recycling in the U.S. However, the EPA MSW report states states that number was 1 million short tons, which would equate to 0.9 million metric tons.

Study author Kees Balde told E-Scrap News via email that in translating EPA data on electronics recycling, "maybe something went wrong in the conversion / small calculation error."

On the numerator-denominator discrepancy, study co-author Feng Wang explained to E-Scrap News that researchers held out on including appliance recovery totals because appliances are not handled by official take-back programs in the U.S. The study strictly defines recovery as material "formally treated by national take-back systems" and therefore also does not include electronics recovered outside of state programs.

"We did not include the collection figures of appliances because we checked the guidelines of the U.S. EPA and found out that it was calculated based on the steel content of the appliances, not based on actual collection figures from various schemes in all the U.S. states," Feng explained. "On the other hand, the guidelines say the collection/recycling figure for select consumer electronics are from the state-level collection data."

Feng added, "We are aiming to improve the quality of the figures in the coming editions [of the study]."

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Canadian OEM, retailer reps push for revamped performance metrics

Thu, 04/30/2015 - 09:52
Canadian OEM, retailer reps push for revamped performance metrics

By Bobby Elliott, E-Scrap News

April 30, 2015

Leaders behind Ontario's electronics stewardship program say performance goals should be based on more than just weight.

A report last week showed the Ontario Electronic Stewardship (OES) group fell short of 2014 collection targets. However, Melanie Wilde, OES' executive director, told E-Scrap News the manufacturer and retailer-funded effort is still making notable progress.

According to Wilde, awareness of the Ontario program among residents reached an all-time high of 68 percent in 2014. What's more, 96.5 percent of Ontarians live within six miles of an OES collection depot. The province has a population of 13.6 million people.

In light of those numbers, Wilde said manufacturers and retailers support "a more diverse suite of performance measures beyond weight collected that include factors such as awareness and accessibility."

Since its inception five years ago, OES has recycled more than 361,000 tons of electronics, with the average resident recycling turning in more than 10 pounds worth of e-scrap per year, according to the group.

For comparison's sake, the U.S. state with the highest reported per capita recycling rate is Vermont's, which in 2013 garnered almost eight pounds per resident. On average, state programs collect between three and six pounds of material per resident every year.

Jay Illingworth, who heads Canada's national stewardship efforts under the Electronic Products Recycling Association, said Ontario's program is facing a challenge other provincial and state program leaders likely know well.

"Lightweighting is an issue that affects all of us in this industry," Illingworth noted. "In just five years, we've seen a dramatic shift in a number of products. CRTs are still coming into our programs, but we're also seeing flat screens, MP3 players and the new, lightweight electronics that are made of aluminum and plastic parts primarily. That's where we think performance based on weight really doesn't tell the whole picture."

Wilde added that when OES' annual collection goals were set in 2009 there was no way to fully anticipate the changing, lighterweight stream of 2014.

In Ontario, OES has asked provincial regulators to lower the 2015 collection target to more fairly reflect the current e-scrap stream. Wilde noted non-weight based targets could be "worth considering," but expressed support "for at least reviewing them on an annual basis."

 

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Right-to-repair issues continue to affect e-scrap industry

Thu, 04/30/2015 - 09:51
Right-to-repair issues continue to affect e-scrap industry

By Dylan de Thomas, E-Scrap News

April 30, 2015

Don’t think intellectual property laws apply to the scrap electronics recycling and refurbishment industry? Advocates fighting for "the right to repair" have news for you.

Speaking at last week’s ISRI convention in Vancouver, Corynne McSherry, legal director for the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), laid out the issues facing those companies that wish to repair and refurbish the smartphones and tablets that are increasingly making up the material stream for the e-scrap industry.

"Software is now everywhere, in goods as varied as books, cars, phones and refrigerators," McSherry said, noting that copyright restrictions are expanding alongside the so-called Internet of Things.

Electronics scrap processors have already been hampered by a copyright law that was intended to stem online piracy of music and movies but has been used instead to disallow the “unlocking” of mobile devices. That's had a negative effect on a key value activity for the e-scrap industry — refurbishing and resell mobile phones and tablets.

At issue is section 1201 of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA), a 1998 law that was intended to fight piracy but has instead been used by companies as varied as Apple, John Deere and General Motors to use copyright infringement claims to stop independent businesses from repairing products. E-scrap companies, for instance, have been hampered in efforts to “jailbreak” iPads, while farmers wanting to fix their tractors and mechanics aiming to repair cars have run into similar roadblocks.

Congress intervened last year and made legal the practice of unlocking mobile devices in the U.S., but the fix is temporary. Because of the law's language, exemptions to the DMCA must be filed and approved by the Librarian of Congress every three years. That's an “extremely burdensome process,” said McSherry.

The exemption filing is currently being undertaken by a coalition of groups including ISRI and the Juelsgaard Intellectual Property & Innovation Clinic at Stanford Law School.

At the ISRI conference, these issues were also addressed by Kyle Wiens, a reuse advocate and founder of the electronics repair resource iFixit. Wiens noted laws protecting right to repair have been introduced in New York and Minnesota. “Recyclers need fair-market access,” Wiens said. He laid out the importance of access to repair manuals, which allow recycling and refurb companies to safely dismantle or repair consumer electronics of all kinds.

Both Wiens and McSherry were optimistic about the New York and Minnesota bills. They were also enthusiastic about a recently introduced national bill, the “Breaking Down Barriers to Innovation Act,” which would make the section 1201 exemptions permanent.

It remains to be seen whether the bills or requested exemptions will succeed leading to what Wiens calls “the single biggest revenue-generating opportunity that’s come along for the recycling industry in a long time.”

McSherry hopes right-to-repair legislation will get her group will pull her group out of the e-scrap space. "The win is when … you don't have to hear from a copyright lawyer to do your job," she said.

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Certification scorecard

Thu, 04/30/2015 - 09:50
Certification scorecard

April 30, 2015

With the roster of companies attaining third-party certifications or audits continuing to grow, E-Scrap News has compiled a roundup of the firms announcing certification this past week.

AccuShred LLC of Toledo, Ohio; Automated Shredding of Fort Mill, S.C.; Business Data Record Services, Inc. of New Brighton, Minn.; Infoshred, Inc. of Bedford Heights., Ohio; iSecure Inc. of Grants Pass, Ore.; Maverick Shredding of Weslaco, Texas; Proshred of Houston of Stafford, Texas; and Secure Shredding, Inc. of Ft. Myers, Fla. have either achieved or renewed their NAID Certifications for Physical Destruction of Hard Drives.

E-Scrap News has added OHSAS 18001 and NAID AAA into its certification directory, as well as moved the directory online. If your firm recently completed these certifications, a CHWMEG audit or an ISO 9001, ISO 14001, R2, RIOS or e-Stewards certification, e-mail dleif@resource-recycling.com to be included in this section and in E-Scrap News' directory. The full directory is available here.

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NewsBits

Thu, 04/30/2015 - 09:48
NewsBits

April 30, 2015

The Obama administration's decision to remove EPEAT certification from an executive order on federal purchasing won't spell doom for the standard, the head of the Green Electronics Council told The Guardian. Robert Frisbee, CEO of the Green Electronics Council, which administers the standard, said he's confident federal agencies will continue to purchase electronics that meet the standard.

A take-back event in West Hartford, Conn. drew a slew of folks dropping off TVs, laptops, monitors and other electronics. E-scrap was collected by Green Monster e-Cycling, and the event was hosted by NBC Connecticut.

Sims Recycling Solutions will expand an ITAD facility in Singapore to meet high demand, the company announced. The global IT asset disposal provider has outgrown its original space, first occupied in February 2008. Another ITAD provider, Arrow Electronics, recently announced the opening of its first facility in Singapore.

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Arrow opens Singapore ITAD facility

Thu, 04/23/2015 - 09:21
Arrow opens Singapore ITAD facility

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

April 23, 2015

Arrow Electronics has announced the opening of its first IT asset disposition facility in Singapore.

In announcing the move, the publicly traded company said the Singapore outpost "aligns with our commitment to pursuing emerging and high-growth markets."

"Our capabilities and reach are growing with the global demand for IT asset disposition and reverse logistics services, and we believe we have the most robust set of capabilities and the global reach to serve our customers wherever they need us," Mark Majeske, president of Arrow's global reverse logistics business, said in a statement.

A recent study on global e-scrap generation by the United Nations University noted Singapore as one of the largest per-inhabitant generators of e-scrap. According to the study, the average Singaporean generated more than 43 pounds of e-scrap in 2014.

According to Arrow, the Singapore site has been designed to be in compliance with "local, national and international standards for data security and environmental regulations," including the R2 certification.

In February, Arrow announced the acquisition of RDC, a subsidiary of Computacenter UK, for a reported $84 million. The company has made numerous acquisitions of e-scrap firms in recent years and operates nine ITAD locations in the U.S.

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<i>E-Scrap 2015</i>: Booth space going fast

Thu, 04/23/2015 - 09:20
E-Scrap 2015: Booth space going fast

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

April 23, 2015

Want to be sure your company gets top-level exposure at North America's premier electronics recycling conference? Register now to exhibit.

The trade show hall at the E-Scrap Conference has sold out in recent years, so smart industry insiders know not to wait to reserve their space. Exhibiting is a prime opportunity for brokers, processors, equipment makers, trade groups, logistics pros and other stakeholders to get their goods and ideas out in front of the e-scrap industry's movers and shakers.

Don't be left out of the action. Full exhibitor information is available here.

E-Scrap 2015 is taking place Sept. 1-3, 2015 (that's the week before Labor Day) at Omni ChampionsGate in Orlando, Florida. Check in at e-scrapconference.com for all the latest information on exhibiting, sponsoring and attending.

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OEMs fall short of Ontario e-scrap collection targets

Thu, 04/23/2015 - 09:17
OEMs fall short of Ontario e-scrap collection targets

By Jared Paben, E-Scrap News

April 23, 2015

Ontario's electronics stewardship organization fell 14 percent short of its e-scrap collection target for 2014, and it said smaller and lighter products were to blame.

Ontario Electronic Stewardship (OES), an industry-funded nonprofit organization, oversaw the collection of 78,284 tons of e-scrap last year, according to a report filed with provincial regulators.

That was short of the original goal of 90,941 tons. Set in 2009, that target was based on dated information and assumption on technology in the future, according to OES.

"The dramatic change in weights, types of devices and change in composition just wasn’t possible to predict back in 2009," the report states. "For example, in the past 10 years the weight of televisions has declined by as much as 57 percent, and multi-function devices by as much as 40 percent. Lightweighting, miniaturization and consolidation of products are beginning to occur at a rapid pace."

The 2014 collection was the largest per capita of any province in Canada, Waste Diversion Ontario spokeswoman Julie Kwiecinski said. Waste Diversion Ontario (WDO) regulates e-scrap collection and approves program plans submitted by the manufacturers' group.

OES collected the equivalent of 11.5 pounds for each provincial resident in 2014. At more than 12.8 million people, the province is by far Canada's most populous.

"What's really important here is the accuracy of the collection target," Kwiecinski said. "OES's collection target is based on five-year-old data when ... tablets didn't even exist."

WDO has asked OES to present revised targets that address industry and recycling trends, including lightweighting and today's shorter product life cycles, according to Kwiecinski. Revised targets would give WDO a better understanding of OES's true performance, she noted.

OES said it calculated a revised target of 67,638 tons for 2014 to reflect new information on weights, product lifespan and volume, the report states.

WDO hasn't yet approved any revised targets, Kwiecinski noted. The 2015 target has yet to be set, she said, and if a new target isn't available, the 2014 one will be used.

OES also reported 96.5 percent of Ontario residents live within 6.2 miles of an OES e-scrap drop-off site or affiliated drop-off point. That's based on a study conducted by Environmental Design and Management, a firm it hired in November 2014. It also looked at drive time and determined 98.3 percent of the province's urban population is within a 15-minute drive of a drop-off location.

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Wide world of e-scrap

Thu, 04/23/2015 - 09:15
Wide world of e-scrap

April 23, 2015

The United Nations University says just about 16 percent of the world's e-scrap was recycled in 2014, while a new report sheds light on Australia's e-scrap recycling infrastructure.

A report from the United Nations University suggests 46.1 million tons of e-scrap and appliances entered the global waste stream in 2014. Of that total, just 7.2 million tons were collected through formal take-back channels, the report states. Stay tuned as E-Scrap News develops more coverage on the data, including figures for U.S. generation and recovery of end-of-life electronics.

The Canadian wing of office supply chain Staples has released its 2014 Sustainability Report, including data on in-store e-scrap collection. According to the report, Staples Canada collected about 8.7 million pounds of electronics, surpassing a goal of collecting 7.9 million pounds.

The U.K.'s BBC recently published a report looking at startups and nonprofit groups in different pockets of the globe that have taken unique approaches to recovering old electronics. One featured entity is BinBag, based in India: The company serves as an online portal connecting consumers with e-scrap in their homes and companies that want to process the material.

A group called Australia and New Zealand Recycling Platform has issued a report stating Australia's e-scrap recycling network is severely lagging the recycling efforts occurring in the U.S. and other countries across the world.

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Certification scorecard

Thu, 04/23/2015 - 09:14
Certification scorecard

April 23, 2015

With the roster of companies attaining third-party certifications or audits continuing to grow, E-Scrap News has compiled a roundup of the firms announcing certification this past week.

Affordable Shred of Buffalo, Ill.; Best Shredding (Div/Best Service Pros) of Langley, B.C.; and Shred Confidential Incorporated of Anaheim, Calif. have either achieved or renewed their NAID Certifications for Physical Destruction of Hard Drives.

Also, Dynamic Recycling TN LLC of Nashville, Tenn.; EPC’s E-Scrap Processing Center of Earth City, Mo.; ER2-Electronic Responsible Recyclers of Mesa, Ariz.; and IT Renew of Newark, Calif. have either achieved or renewed their NAID Certifications for Computer Hard Drive Sanitization and Physical Destruction of Hard Drives.

E-Scrap News has added OHSAS 18001 and NAID AAA into its certification directory, as well as moved the directory online. If your firm recently completed these certifications, a CHWMEG audit or an ISO 9001, ISO 14001, R2, RIOS or e-Stewards certification, e-mail dleif@resource-recycling.com to be included in this section and in E-Scrap News' directory. The full directory is available here.

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