E-Scrap News Magazine

Updated: 14 hours 54 min ago

Dlubak says Arizona glass piles will be moved

Thu, 01/08/2015 - 13:37
Dlubak says Arizona glass piles will be moved

By Bobby Elliott, E-Scrap News

Jan. 9, 2015

Dlubak Glass has informed its customers that glass piles outside a closed Arizona CRT processing operation will wind up moving to end markets. The site has drawn regulatory scrutiny of late.

In a Dec. 5 letter, a company executive stated, "Dlubak has been finalizing transportation to various end customers."

According to Dlubak's director, Herb Schall, glass stored at the Yuma, Arizona site is "processed, furnace-ready soda lime glass, of which roughly 2,000 tons contain lead oxide."

Soda lime glass is a common type of glass found in windowpanes, containers and bottles.

From Schall's description, it is unclear whether the glass in Arizona is all CRT glass, including 2,000 tons of leaded funnel glass, or whether the glass stored there is mixed glass.

Schall did not return a request for comment.

According to the company website, the Yuma site in question is a former CRT glass processing plant. It closed in early 2014 and the company has received pressure from the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality (ADEQ) to properly manage the glass stored there and correct a series of environmental infractions.

At press time, ADEQ has not responded to a request for comment.

A quiet but substantial presence in the CRT recycling landscape, Dlubak's processing business supplies recycled leaded glass cullet to a variety of markets. The company continues processing CRT glass at its Upper Sandusky, Ohio location.

Ohio EPA documents obtained by E-Scrap News show the agency is in the process of reviewing annual data from Dlubak to determine whether it has met its yearly obligation to recycle 75 percent of its glass inventory in Ohio. According to Ohio EPA spokesperson Dina Pierce, more information has been requested from Dlubak "before making a determination whether they have met the 75 percent rule."

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Plastics Recycling 2015: All about e-plastics

Thu, 01/08/2015 - 13:35
Plastics Recycling 2015: All about e-plastics

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

Jan. 9, 2015

North America's largest plastics recycling conference will offer some useful knowledge to e-scrap players.

Plastics Recycling 2015, set for next month in Dallas, will offer an exclusive first look at In-depth research on the plastics recovered from scrap electronics. This original data-compiling project investigates where e-plastic discards are being generated and where they’re going once they are processed.

A critical analysis of e-plastics consumption, recovery and recycling will be offered, and it will be accompanied by strategies that firms can employ to overcome e-plastic profitability challenges.

Plastics Recycling 2015 is taking place Feb. 23-25 at the Hyatt Regency in Dallas, Texas. Head to plasticsrecycling.com for all the information on attending, exhibiting and sponsoring.


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EPA: States decide whether CRT-to-ADC is recycling

Thu, 01/08/2015 - 13:33
EPA: States decide whether CRT-to-ADC is recycling

By Bobby Elliott, E-Scrap News

Jan. 9, 2015

Pressed to take a stance on whether treated CRT glass used as alternative daily cover can be considered recycling, the U.S. EPA left it to individual states to make the call.

In a letter sent to certification body e-Stewards, U.S. EPA states, "The decision whether use of treated CRT glass as ADC does or does not constitute recycling is a decision best left up to individual states based on a consideration of specific circumstances."

EPA received a formal request on Oct. 31 from e-Stewards to make the judgement. EPA had previously issued a statement that called the ADC option disposal, and the October request by e-Stewards appears to have been an effort to further clarify the decision.

Jim Puckett, e-Stewards' executive director, did not return a request for comment on EPA's response.

Kuusakoski U.S. has been using treated CRT funnel glass as ADC at a landfill in Peoria, Illinois since 2013. The approach has generated widespread industry debate about whether the process should be considered recycling or disposal. With few domestic recycling outlets for CRT glass, environmental officials in Illinois and Vermont have decided to count collected pounds bound for ADC as recycling. Several other states have deemed the method disposal, meaning original equipment manufacturers cannot count any tonnages sent to ADC toward their collection quotas in those states.

The practice has been permitted by e-Stewards only as a last resort among its members, and if the option is exercised, the pounds are considered disposal (not recycling) in the eyes of the certificaiton body.

Administrators of the R2 standard, meanwhile, have banned the approach altogether.

Last year Kuusakoski announced an alternative plan. Instead of using treated glass as ADC, the company is looking into storing the material in a mineable cell for future recovery.

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Three more years of Videocon CRT demand?

Thu, 01/08/2015 - 13:31
Three more years of Videocon CRT demand?

By Bobby Elliott, E-Scrap News

Jan. 9, 2015

An industry executive with ties to the lone remaining glass-to-glass CRT recycling operation says the company, Videocon, will be continuing to manufacture CRT TVs and monitors for at least another three years.

If accurate, such a time frame would provide breathing room for U.S. companies needing to move collected glass downstream.

"The CRT market is likely to exist for three years, if not more," Albino Bessa, president of Videocon glass supplier Technologies Displays Americas, told E-Scrap News.

Bessa said global demand for the Videocon's line of CRT TVs is compensating for a shrinking Indian market.

"Videocon is not aiming at the Indian market only," Bessa said. "Its glass production caters to the global market. And the global market is being served accordingly."

Bessa would not say the degree to which Videocon's current CRT business is supported by non-Indian buyers, but he noted that "combined volumes are high."

Videocon is the only company in the world that still recycles old CRTs to make new ones, operating the glass-to-glass process at its facility in Bharuch, India. It has become a much-used CRT recycling outlet for U.S. e-scrap companies in recent years, and the question of how long the company would continue to show demand for CRT glass has lingered over the industry.

A November article in The Hindu Business Line noted Videocon's chief operating officer, CM Singh, said the CRT market in India would last at least another year. The statement sparked a post on the blog of e-scrap consultant and research firm Transparent Planet .

The Hindu Business Line also mentioned Videocon's possible growing interest in manufacturing flat-panel display televisions. Bessa challenged that notion.

"As far as I know, Videocon is not planning to produce flat panels yet ," he said, adding that most of India is still unable to afford the higher price tag of the sleeker models.

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Tablets expected to experience slow growth in 2015

Thu, 01/08/2015 - 13:29
Tablets expected to experience slow growth in 2015

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

Jan. 9, 2015

Research firm Gartner is anticipating demand for tablets to slow in 2015 while the global PC market could see its first signs of growth in years.

In a Jan. 5 update to previous expectations for 2015 tablet, PC and device markets, Gartner writes that shipments of tablets in 2015 will grow by 8 percent, while PC shipments will increase by 1 percent.

According to the U.K.-based firm, 233 million tablets will be shipped during the year compared to the 216 million that shipped in 2014.

Ranjit Atwal, Gartner research director, says the years of double-digit percentage point increases for tablet shipments have been put to rest for several reasons.

"One is that the lifetime of tablets is being extended — they are shared out amongst family members and software upgrades, especially for iOS devices, keep the tablets current," Atwal stated in a press release. "Another factor includes the lack of innovation in hardware which refrains consumers from upgrading."

PC shipments, on the other hand, are predicted to climb to 321 million units in 2015 after coming in at 318 million units in 2014.

Looking at the entire device stream, a category that includes tablets, PCs and smartphones, Gartner says 2.5 billion units will be shipped in 2015. That represents a 4 percent increase from 2014 figures and continues to point to a future e-scrap stream that will be forced to handle growing numbers of individual units.



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Certification scorecard

Thu, 01/08/2015 - 13:27
Certification scorecard

Jan. 9, 2015

With the roster of companies attaining third-party certifications or audits continuing to grow, E-Scrap News has compiled a roundup of the firms announcing certification this past week.

Capital Area Corporate Recycling Council of Baton Rouge, Louisiana is now certified to R2:2013 and RIOS.

Global Electronic Recycling is now certified to the following standards at its Memphis, Tennessee facility: ISO 9001, ISO 14001, R2:2013 and RIOS.

A1 Datashred, LLC of Tewksbury, Massachusetts; ALLMOVE Mobile Shredding of Winnipeg, Manitoba; Citadel Information Management in Westmont, Illinois; DataLock (Div of 3GS, LLC) of Mount Vernon, Illinois; DFW Shredding, Inc. of Plano, Texas; Docu-Depot Inc. of Lasalle, Quebec; Info Dog Security of Spencer, Iowa; Jayhawk File Express, L.L.C. of Topeka, Kansas; Lone Star Shredding & Document Storage (Div of 3GS, LLC) of Mercedes, Texas; Phoenix Recycling Inc. of Winnipeg, Manitoba; SAFESHRED of Commerce, California; Sentry Data Management, LLC of Blackshear, Georgia; Vital Records Control of Florida, LLC of Melbourne, Florida; and Without A Trace Mobile Shredding of Scarborough, Maine have either achieved or renewed their NAID Certifications for Physical Destruction of Hard Drives.

E-Scrap News has added OHSAS 18001 and NAID AAA into its certification directory, as well as moved the directory online. If your firm recently completed these certifications, a CHWMEG audit or an ISO 9001, ISO 14001, R2, RIOS or e-Stewards certification, e-mail dleif@resource-recycling.com to be included in this section and in E-Scrap News' directory. The full directory is available at www.tinyurl.com/Certified-E-scrap.


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NewsBits

Thu, 01/08/2015 - 13:17
NewsBits

Jan. 9, 2015

The New York Times recently covered recycling personal electronics in a responsible way, providing information on how consumers can search for a certified e-scrap recycling entity. The article provides links to the e-Stewards and R2 certification programs as well as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Electronics Challenge program.

An extensive story in The Atlantic takes a look at the well-known Agbogbloshie e-scrap hotspot in Accra, Ghana. The story notes "up to 80 percent" of the world's electronic discards may be ending up in crude processing yards like the one described – that 80 percent figure has been hotly debated among e-scrap professionals over the past decade. The Atlantic does add some new information to the discussion, however, tracing how Agbogbloshie went from a local dumping ground for fruit and other products that wouldn't sell at a nearby market to a final resting place for electronics from across the globe.

Washington's electronics recycling program pulled in 44.36 million pounds of devices in 2014, a 1.8 decline from 2013's 45.13 million pounds. The decline, the first in the program's 6-year history, is being characterized as a positive step for the state and a sign that "Washingtonians have finally reached the point where most of their old electronics have been pulled out of the closet and sent to recycling." The data is also one of the first signals that CRT tonnages could be plateauing.

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The e-scrap year in review

Wed, 12/31/2014 - 13:44
The e-scrap year in review

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

Dec. 31, 2014

With the new year upon us, E-Scrap News recaps a busy 2014 news cycle that saw CRT glass management issues take center stage alongside legislative battles and some surprising industry twists and turns.

In January, talk of a national bill limiting e-scrap exports was quelled after remarks made by Rep. John Shimkus. In a meeting with the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries (ISRI), Shimkus stated the proposed legislation, known as RERA, was not on his subcommittee's agenda for 2014. That development was celebrated by ISRI, a powerful opponent of the legislation, while the Coalition for American Electronics Recycling pledged to fight on.

On the heels of an announcement by Sims Recycling Solutions that 12 of its 14 North American facilities had become dual-certified to the e-Stewards and R2 standards, E-Scrap News took a look at the growing dual-certification trend. Research found more than 70 percent of firms certified to e-Stewards also held the R2 certification. John Shegerian, the CEO of Electronic Recyclers International, told the magazine dual certification was a simple matter of client demand. "So many clients wanted R2 and so many clients wanted e-Stewards, so we said we're just going to do both."

Based on the findings of an extensive telephone survey, the Consumer Electronics Association (CEA) released data on remaining U.S. CRT tonnages. While about half as high as a previous estimate by recycling firm Kuusakoski, the CEA figure suggested roughly 3.5 million tons of CRT TVs and computer monitors could be found in American closets, basements and living rooms. "There are still a lot of CRTs out there. ... Six billion pounds of CRT TVs and 1 billion pounds of CRT monitors," Walter Alcorn, CEA's vice president of environmental affairs, said at the time. "But it's not infinite. This too shall pass, in terms of the CRT stream."

A former e-Stewards and R2-certified firm found itself in hot water this past March after leaving behind a significant stockpile of CRT glass at its closed Cincinnati site. After closing in 2013, 2trg sold its assets to publicly traded E-Waste Systems (EWSI) and claimed EWSI was also responsible for the glass on site. EWSI denied those claims but eventually participated in an effort to clean up the site. EWSI, the subject of a feature in the June 2014 print edition of E-Scrap News, would later be evicted from its own Ohio location in late 2014.

Creative Recycling Systems announcedin May it would be closing its central processing facility in Tampa, Florida. The announcement was followed by rapid closures of Creative properties throughout the country as the firm battled an $18.7 million lawsuit against it by Regions Bank. Creative filed for bankruptcy and looked for a potential buyer, but on Dec. 16 of 2014 announced it would aim to liquify its remaining assets.

After closing facilities in Dallas and New Jersey, Sims Recycling Solutions (SRS) formulated a major restructuring of its Canadian and U.K. operations. The company said it was closing all Canadian operations and substantially reducing its U.K. activity. While competition was cited as a major challenge in the U.K., Sims argued original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) in Canada had formed a "virtual monopoly organization" that forced the firm out of the region.

In a victory for reuse advocates in the industry, Congress ">passed a phone unlocking bill in late July to overturn a 2012 decision by the Librarian of Congress that essentially made unlockings illegal. By making both individual and bulk unlockings legal again, Congress opened the door for the industry to bypass wireless carriers and free devices to be resold and reused worldwide. The victory, however, has the potential to be short-lived, as the Librarian of Congress has the power in 2015 to again review the reach of the Digital Millenium Copyright Act and determine whether unlockings should be legal or illegal.

Though much of 2014 was defined by CRT management struggles, a note of hope was sounded in late summer. Reporting on the state electronics recycling program in Washington showed e-scrap tonnages collected in the Evergreen State were on the decline year-over-year, an indication that fewer CRT devices were being handed in by residents. Some industry observers said the numbers may be a sign that U.S. CRT volumes could be close to plateauing.

The developing world's informal processing sector was a focal point of analysis and discussion at the Electronics Recycling Asia Conference, held in Singapore in Asia. Speakers from government groups, recycling firms and nonprofit organizations all touched on strategies to help transform processing conditions in poorer areas but noted existing structures should be developed, not eradicated altogether.


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Creative to liquidate assets

Wed, 12/31/2014 - 13:43
Creative to liquidate assets

By Bobby Elliott, E-Scrap News

Dec. 31, 2014

Florida-based Creative Recycling Systems has moved to liquify its assets, court documents show.

Creative, which filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy this September after being sued to the tune of $18.7 million, announced the decision on Dec. 16. A notice sent to potentially affected parties and obtained by E-Scrap News states an additional meeting will be held with creditors on Jan. 23.

Creditors have until April 23, the notice reads, to file a proof of claim in the case.

Gerard A. McHale Jr., the company's trustee in the case, was unavailable for comment.

Founded by Jon Yob, Creative was once seen as a prominent player in the e-scrap space, with processing hubs in Florida, Georgia and North Carolina and collection sites throughout much of the eastern U.S. It was sold in 2012 to investment group Intersection One, which eventually went on to sue Yob for allegedly misrepresenting the value and standing of the company.

The suit was dismissed on Sept. 26 of this year and Yob provided a detailed defense of Creative to E-Scrap News, but the company remained embroiled in the separate and still-standing lawsuit filed against it by Regions Bank. The case, which alleges Creative owes nearly $18.7 million to the bank, forced the company to close all of its operations, file for bankruptcy and look for potential suitors.

While a glimmer of optimism remained for the company to find an interested party, the company's Dec. 16 move to liquify its assets is likely a sign no deal could be reached.

In September, the company was said to have an estimated 30 million pounds of CRT glass in need of processing.


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Certification scorecard

Wed, 12/31/2014 - 13:41
Certification scorecard

Dec. 31, 2014

With the roster of companies attaining third-party certifications or audits continuing to grow, E-Scrap News has compiled a roundup of the firms announcing certification this past week.

The Charlotte, North Carolina facility of All Green Recycling, Inc. is certified to R2:2013 and RIOS.

B&K Technology Solutions, Inc. dba Advanced Technology Recycling is now certified to the OHSAS 18001 and R2:2013 standards at its Peoria, Illinois facility.

IT Asset Partners of Chatsworth, California has achieved certification to the OHSAS 18001 and R2:2013 standards.

E-Scrap News has added OHSAS 18001 and NAID AAA into its certification directory, as well as moved the directory online. If your firm recently completed these certifications, a CHWMEG audit or an ISO 9001, ISO 14001, R2, RIOS or e-Stewards certification, e-mail dleif@resource-recycling.com to be included in this section and in E-Scrap News' directory. The full directory is available at www.tinyurl.com/Certified-E-scrap.

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NewsBits

Wed, 12/31/2014 - 13:39
NewsBits

Dec. 31, 2014

E-scrap recycling will restart on Jan. 2 in Lake County, Illinois after the Solid Waste Agency of Lake County (SWALCO) struck a deal with a new operator, Dynamic Recycling of La Crosse, Wisconsin and decided to dip into its savings to pay for continued service, according to the Chicago Tribune. The former operator, Sims Recycling Solutions, stopped service Dec. 18 after costs grew prohibitive, the paper reported.

Throwing old electronics into the trash or recycling bins "will be illegal in New York state starting Jan. 1. It’s the final piece of a 2010 state e-scrap law that established an electronics manufacturers-subsidized collection and recycling system. Violators of the new provision could receive a $100 fine for each violation.

Nova Scotia residents recycled about 5,000 tons of e-scrap last year, or about 11 pounds per person, according to CBC. That number gives the province top prize for per-capita e-scrap recycling in Canada.

The holiday season often means in with new electronics and out with the old, but governments large and small want to ensure "out" doesn’t mean in the trash can. Best Buy takes in more than 400 pounds of used electronics for recycling for every minute its stores are open, according to the Los Angeles Times. In Buncome County, North Carolina, consumers can take old electronics to various outlets for recycling, including Best Buy or a recycling center at the county landfill.

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California firms receive reminder on downstream due diligence

Thu, 12/18/2014 - 16:16
California firms receive reminder on downstream due diligence

By Bobby Elliott, E-Scrap News

Dec. 19, 2014

In another sign of the increasingly tight CRT glass market, regulators in California have asked registered e-scrap firms to exercise caution when planning to send glass beyond state lines.

"If your company is shipping CRTs or CRT glass out-of-state, you should understand the difference between a destination that remanufactures CRT glass and/or engages in lead smelting, and an intermediate facility," the Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC) wrote in a Dec. 10 advisory notice. "Most CRT processing facilities in other states are intermediate facilities. Your company bears responsibility under California law for material while it is at an intermediate facility, and until it reaches its final destination for recycling."

The notice urges recycling firms to "ask hard questions of out-of-state facilities in order to avoid potentially crippling liability for material mishandled downstream." It also references the costly clean-up of Dow Management's Yuma, Arizona CRT glass operation, which had received and stockpiled large quantities of glass from California and Washington. The company later went out of business, and California firms were required to retrieve glass sent to Dow and have it sent elsewhere for final processing.

"DTSC does not want to see such a scenario happen again — either for the sake of the environment or for the sake of California recyclers," DTSC's Rita Hypnarowski wrote in a follow-up email.


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Kuusakoski acquires processing firm

Thu, 12/18/2014 - 16:14
Kuusakoski acquires processing firm

By Dan Leif and Bobby Elliott, E-Scrap News

Dec. 19, 2014

Illinois-based Vintage Tech Recycling has been purchased by Kuusakoski, a central player in the ongoing industry debate over CRT glass management.

A U.S.-based Kuusakoski executive confirmed the deal in an interview with E-Scrap News this week. Kuusakoski USA's parent company, Finland-based Kuusakoski Recycling, which has owned 40 percent of Vintage Tech since 2011, has acquired the remaining 60 percent of the company's shares.

Vintage Tech was founded in 2005 and operates six processing facilities (two in Illinois and one each in California, Michigan, Missouri and Pennsylvania). Most of those facilities carry both e-Stewards and R2 certification, and the company is active in several state take-back programs. Karrie Gibson, the processing firm's president, told E-Scrap News Vintage Tech operates more than 1,000 permanent collection sites nationwide.

"In 2014, Vintage Tech collected and recycled more than 110 million pounds of electronics in the U.S. marketplace, and Kuusakoski will continue to grow that volume and maximize the value of the materials while following all compliance under state legislation and certifications," Gibson said.

Financial terms of the acquisition were not disclosed. The two companies will be run separately with a "shared executive team," Gibson said. Gibson and her husband, Todd, Vintage Tech's vice president of sales and marketing, will remain in their current leadership roles "for as long as it takes to assure a smooth transition for our customers and employees," she said.

Kuusakoski has positioned itself as a potential downstream option for CRT glass. The company, in partnership with an Illinois landfill, employs a technology that "stabilizes" lead within processed CRT glass so that it can be used as alternative daily cover (ADC) at the landfill site.

Few state regulators have allowed CRT glass destined for ADC to be counted toward state-program pound quotas. The U.S. EPA has suggested the process is disposal, not recycling.

Kuusakoski representatives said the CRT-to-ADC operation is at about 25 percent capacity, having processed roughly 12,000 tons of material in 2014, versus the 50,000 tons they had hoped to garner.

Kuusakoski leaders said the decision to buy Vintage Tech was driven by a desire to cut deeper pathways into the North American e-scrap sector, including the refurb space. They said glass currently collected through Vintage Tech contracts won't necessarily head into the ADC pipeline.

"The OEMs that Vintage Tech serves chose the destination for the glass produced under their respective programs, and this will not change," said Rich Hipp, CEO and president of Kuusakoski USA. "With the acquisition of Vintage Tech we will now become a coast-to-coast service company with front end collection networks and fully integrated customer service and operations that will provide that true one-stop-shop service to our customers."

Kuusakoski USA and Vintage Tech both have their headquarters in Plainfield, Illinois.

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Deadline for transitioning to R2:2013 draws closer

Thu, 12/18/2014 - 16:12
Deadline for transitioning to R2:2013 draws closer

By Bobby Elliott, E-Scrap News

Dec. 19, 2014

About a quarter of firms certified to the R2 standard have yet to transition to the latest version of the certification.

With a Dec. 31 deadline looming, 414 of the 550 facilities certified to the R2 standard are R2:2013 certified, Patty Osterberg told E-Scrap News. Osterberg serves as the Director of Education and Outreach at SERI, the group that manages the R2 standard.

“It is a significant achievement for companies to successfully implement the rigorous requirements of the R2:2013 standard," Osterberg said in a statement. "We are extremely pleased that so many have made the transition, and are especially encouraged by the growing global footprint of the R2 Standard."

According to Osterberg, companies certified to the standard are now operating in 19 different countries.

SERI expects 80-85 percent of the 550 facilities in its system to gain the R2:2013 certification by Dec. 31.

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Arkansas sees e-scrap tonnages fall

Thu, 12/18/2014 - 16:10
UPDATED: Arkansas sees e-scrap tonnages fall

By Bobby Elliott, E-Scrap News

Dec. 19, 2014

Arkansas' annual review of recycling performance shows the state has increased its overall recycling rate to 39 percent, but e-scrap recycling is noticeably down.

E-scrap recycling tonnages fell during the state's fiscal year (July 2013 through June 2014) by about a quarter, a report from the Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality states. In 2014, 2,919 tons of electronics was reported recycled, compared with 3,917 in 2013.

"We've made a conscientious effort here throughout the state to clear out all of that stuff in people's homes that they'd been holding onto," Robert Hunter, the recycling and marketing manager at ADEQ, told E-Scrap News. "We've been counting electronics for several years and we've made a real push with grants to sponsor collection events for free so residents could get rid of that bulky stuff."

Hunter says collection events are now seeing fewer of the heavier monitors and televisions and more lightweight electronics.

Arkansas is not among the 25 states that currently have laws mandating e-scrap recycling programs.

On the whole, overall landfilling of waste generated in the state fell 5 percent in the most recent fiscal year, coming in at 3,265,463 tons, while recycling was up 13 percent, reaching 2,086,820 tons. Waste generation was slightly up during the year at 5,352,283 tons.

Note: An earlier version of this story inaccurately stated Arkansas' overall recycling volume for the year was 1,086,820 tons. The volume was actually 2,086,020 tons. E-Scrap News regrets the error.

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Long-haul shipping prices could drop next year

Thu, 12/18/2014 - 16:07
Long-haul shipping prices could drop next year

By Dan Leif, E-Scrap News

Dec. 19, 2014

An amendment included in the $1 trillion spending bill passed last weekend by Congress suspends two provisions of a trucking rule that long-haul firms say have crunched efficiency. That could mean lower logistics prices for export buyers and some other e-scrap entities.

The trucking provisions in the bill relate to hours-of-service (HOS) regulations that were introduced in 2013 and which many trucking firms and groups have fiercely opposed.

Here's how industry publication Transport Topics characterized the change brought about by the spending bill: "The legislation suspends the requirement that all qualifying restarts contain two consecutive periods of time between 1 a.m. and 5 a.m., and that it can only be used once every 168 hours (or seven days). In other words, the restart rule reverts back to the simple 34-hour restart in effect from 2003 to June 2013."

The HOS requirements will be dropped for a year, and the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration will conduct a study showing the impact of altering the legislation. With the regulations suspended, long-haul truckers will be able to increase their weekly maximum driving hours from 70 to 82.

From an e-scrap perspective, the move will most affect firms that buy and collect material in one section of the country and pay long-haul services to transport it to distant processing or warehouse sites. Companies that buy material for export could also see lower prices – those companies typically pay to have material shipped to U.S. ports before it is moved into foreign markets.


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Certification scorecard

Thu, 12/18/2014 - 16:04
Certification scorecard

Dec. 19, 2014

With the roster of companies attaining third-party certifications or audits continuing to grow, E-Scrap News has compiled a roundup of the firms announcing certification this past week.

Spectrum Ecycle Solutions, Inc. of St. Louis is now certified to OHSAS 18001 and R2:2013.

Crown Information Management of South Daytona, Florida; Gagnaeyðing ehf of Reykjavik, Iceland; and Proshred Security of Crestwood, Illinois have either achieved or renewed their NAID Certifications for Physical Destruction of Hard Drives.

E-Scrap News has added OHSAS 18001 and NAID AAA into its certification directory, as well as moved the directory online. If your firm recently completed these certifications, a CHWMEG audit or an ISO 9001, ISO 14001, R2, RIOS or e-Stewards certification, e-mail dleif@resource-recycling.com to be included in this section and in E-Scrap News' directory. The full directory is available at www.tinyurl.com/Certified-E-scrap.

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NewsBits

Thu, 12/18/2014 - 16:02
NewsBits

Dec. 19, 2014

The U.S. EPA has begun reminding industry stakeholders of a new CRT export policy set to go into effect the day after Christmas. As of Dec. 26, U.S.-based exporters of CRT devices or glass will be required to provide the EPA with more detailed tracking data as well as annual records of the amount of material shipped outside the U.S. For more information on the changes, click here.

In a separate move, the U.S. EPA has pushed ahead with a revision to the 2008 Definition of Solid Waste document. The update focuses on a series of "regulatory lapses" identified by the EPA and various stakeholders that will be remedied through new requirements for firms handling hazardous secondary wastes, including those found in various electronics and parts. For more on that, click here.

Oregon's electronics recycling take-back program is gearing up to expand its reach. Starting Jan. 1, Oregon E-Cycles will accept used keyboards, mice and printers alongside computers, monitors and TVs. The move could be a sign of things to come for state programs throughout the country, as the consumer e-scrap stream evolves.

The U.K.'s Environment Agency (EA) has announced imported concrete blocks containing leaded CRT glass have been put under "waste controls." The blocks, primarily made by Dutch firm A Jansen, reportedly failed a new series of testing for hazardous content and EA has requested additional information from the company as part of the regulatory action.

Despite inroads made by U.S. and Australian firms, China continued its reign as the world's biggest producer of rare earth metals in 2014. Preliminary statistics for the year show the country has largely avoided the negative effects of a March 2013 World Trade Organization ruling that stated Chinese officials were not implementing export quotas.



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Nascent e-scrap processor evicted in Ohio

Thu, 12/11/2014 - 18:04

 

Nascent e-scrap processor evicted in Ohio

By Bobby Elliott, E-Scrap News

Dec. 12, 2014

E-Waste Systems has lost the lease on its Ohio location.

In a Dec. 2 ruling, a Hamilton County judge sided with the owner of the Springdale property leased by E-Waste Systems, Inc. (EWSI) and formally evicted the publicly traded company from the location.

According to court documents sent to E-Scrap News by the Hamilton County Clerk of Courts, the property's owner, DCT Northwest, claimed EWSI failed to pay rent for the months of September and October and refused to leave the 44,000 square-foot location after receiving a "Notice to Leave the Premises" on Oct. 15.

The monthly rent for the property was just under $12,000, plus estimated operating expenses of $5,000, court documents detail. The lease was intended to last three years and it commenced in March 2014.

EWSI's public relations department sent a statement to E-Scrap News regarding the eviction:

 

It is unfortunate that the EWSI-Cincinnati facility is forced to close at this time. We have been faced with a number of challenges that took our focus away from our main objective. We sincerely hope that we can change all of that and dedicate our energies on other areas of the business in order to make a comeback in the Cincinnati area. We feel it is only a temporary situation and we will be able to come back stronger than ever with the help of a very determined and dedicated core team remaining with the company.

 

EWSI, which also has locations in California and New York, says the New York location in particular "is not affected by the current situation in Cincinnati." A Dec. 4 press release announced plans to further expand in New York and venture into India as well.

The company recently announced a reverse stock split "to permit the Company to obtain appropriate financing and make [its] capital structure more attractive to potential investors."

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Vermont switches e-scrap contractors

Thu, 12/11/2014 - 16:09
Vermont switches e-scrap contractors

By Dan Leif, E-Scrap News

Dec. 12, 2014

After being criticized over a bidding process in 2013, e-scrap regulators in Vermont this year added transparency to their methodology – and awarded a state collection and recycling contract to a different bidder.

Earlier this year, the Vermont Standard Plan for electronics recycling management was awarded to the National Center for Electronics Recycling (NCER) and the Northeast Recycling Council (NERC), according to a letter from state officials that was recently obtained by E-Scrap News. NCER and NERC, which bid together, assumed collection and recycling duties on Oct. 1, 2014, and their contract lasts for two years.

The decision moved the contract away from publicly traded Casella Waste Systems, which held collection and recycling duties from Oct. 1, 2013 to Sept. 30, 2014. The state had an option to renew the Casella deal this year but chose not to exercise it.

The switch in contractors comes in the wake of debate that sprang up around the Vermont program a year ago. The state awarded Casella the contract in 2013, but soon afterward, officials at the Vermont Agency of Natural Resources (ANR) came under fire for alleged inconsistent standards in regards to the bidding process.

"We did get a lot of feedback on the bid process that occurred when we awarded the contract to Casella," said Cathy Jamieson, solid waste program manager at ANR. "So we said, 'We will go out to bid again when the contract is up.' … Casella did an excellent job. We had no problems with Casella whatsoever."

Casella did not respond to a request for comment.

According to the ANR letter, four entities submitted bids to the state for the latest contract: Casella, NCER/NERC, the Northeast Resource Recycling Association (NRRA), and R.M.G. Enterprise.

After rejecting R.M.G.'s proposal for being incomplete, ANR scored the three other bids in five categories. Out of a possible 100 total points, the NCER/NERC bid received a 68.75, Casella scored 67.25 and NRRA came in at 61.25.

The main difference in the scores for Casella and NCER/NERC came in the price category. In that section NCER/NERC scored a 17, and Casella was given a 12.

Jamieson said the state laid out clear point totals in each rubric to help address the concerns that were voiced about the selection process last year.

"We were striving toward clarity and transparency for the program so that people could understand our process and decision-making," said Jamieson.

Jason Linnell, executive director of West Virginia-based NCER, said his organization would be using Electronic Recyclers International and Good Point Recycling as recycling subcontractors for material collected in Vermont.

Good Point leader Robin Ingenthron was one of the most vocal critics of state officials after Casella was awarded the contract last year.

Good Point, alongside NRRA, held the Vermont contract for the first two program years, and last fall the state allowed Good Point and NRRA to move ahead on a manufacturer opt-out program that could run parallel to the state standard plan.

Ingenthron said his business would benefit from being back in the standard plan network. "We are glad to be rehiring lost staff, making good on promises to banks and creditors, and working closely again with all our Vermont clients," he said.

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